Never assume they should know a safety precaution simply because it requires

Never assume they should know a safety precaution

This preview shows page 22 - 24 out of 216 pages.

not to talk down to your students or over their heads. Never assume they should know a safety precaution simply because it requires common sense, and never belittle them if they don't. The safety instructor's style is also an important factor. In developing your own style, be sure you observe the following guidelines: Always accept a person's answer don't embarrass a student who has given the wrong answer. Try to provide a positive statement. Say, "You're on the right track," rather than, "That's wrong." Talk to the entire group, not just to the front row. Move around. Speak loud enough that people sitting in the back of the room can hear you. Watch your mannerism. Relax. Take command of the group by your body language. Safety training is often routine and repetitive. Impress upon your students the importance of safety training. Be prepared and present your training material in a professional and enthusiastic manner. SUMMARY In this chapter you have learned about the history of the NAVOSH Program. We have introduced you to the current safety organization's program mission and objectives. We discussed the Naval Safety Center. We addressed safety and occupational health principles along with the elements of a local safety program. Remember, an effective safety program is everyone's responsibility. Safety is a six-letter word for a 7-day job! 1-18
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CHAPTER 2 SAFETY PROGRAM PROMOTION AND ATTITUDES This chapter deals with promoting your safety program and helping your workers develop a positive attitude toward safety. Sometimes people call this a "safety philosophy." It is an essential part of any successful safety program. Some safety supervisors believe that by providing safety training, they are promoting safety. While safety training is a vital element, training alone cannot change unsafe attitudes or promote safe workman- ship. The advertising world calls promotional efforts "marketing." A command must "market" its safety program and sell safety to the worker. SAFETY PHILOSOPHY We often hear safety described as the use of "common sense." That is, safety should be obvious anyone should be able to see a missing safety guard and realize it is a hazard. Unfortunately, that is not the case. Safety is learned and experienced. From a young age, other people warn us about dangerous situations and how to identify potential hazards. Without that training, you might receive injury from such hazards. If not seriously injured, you surely will learn from the experience. You can easily recognize some safety hazards. However, hazards involving toxic chemicals and exposures may not be obvious. Some occupational illnesses, such as asbestos exposure, do not show symptoms for 10 to 35 years. You need to be trained to recognize these hazards. Just as we cannot rely on common sense to prevent mishaps, we cannot assume that everyone has a good attitude toward safety. The following are some attitudes that can contribute to mishaps: The fatalist The people who have this attitude are sure that when "their time is up, nothing can be done about it." The risk-taker People who have this attitude
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