Similarly the farmer of consequentialism think about the consequence of

Similarly the farmer of consequentialism think about

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emphasizes the consequences of actions. Similarly, the farmer of consequentialism think about the consequence of producing a large amount of product, they barely care about the effects from agriculture to environment. They just focus on the production in agriculture. The Utilitarianism also focus on the outcomes or consequence, and it also applies to the farmer in production agriculture. The morality is flexible, sometimes they think about the effect of agriculture to environment; however, the consequence in production is more important to them. Finally, with the Kanian Ethics, the maxim prevent the hunger spreads in all over the world, it is and universalizable issue, and all people are pursuing action to achieve their goals such as: producing a large amount of product in agriculture to provide for the large number of population the world to prevent the hungers.
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Truong Nguyen Article 7: “Agri-Intellectual Reason (A Response to Blake Hurst) Christopher Bedford Oct 20, 1017 Author Note: Christopher Bedford Christopher Bedford is editor-in-chief of The Daily Caller News Foundation and a senior editor at The Daily Caller. Along with writing a weekly column, he is the vice chairman of the Young Americans for Freedom national activist organization, is on the board of the National Journalism Center, and is a judge in the Kansas City Barbecue Society. His work has been featured in The New York Post, National Review, Politico, The Wall Street Journal, RealClearPolitics, The Daily Signal, MSNBC, and The Federalist, and he appears regularly on Fox News and Fox Business.
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Article # 7 Notes Christopher Cook, the author of “Diet for a Dead Planet: How the Food Industry Is Killing Us”, response to the Omnivore’s Delusion skillfully frames many problems with Blake Hurst’s letter. Cook points out that Hurst conflates and confuses the personal with the systemic – mis- identifying his family’s hard work and integrity with an industrial food system that is blatantly unsustainable, exploitative, unfair, and without integrity. Farmers can raise food in different ways, if that is what the market wants. Today, consumers increasingly want food raised in ways that reflect and respect their values: local food production, humane treatment of animals, no antibiotics or hormones, and based on building healthy living soil. Farmers should do with what consumer demands. Farmers have repeatedly sued their “integrators” (the corporations that vertically control the industrial animal system) over the last decade.
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  • Spring '15
  • nicole
  • production agriculture, Missouri Farm Bureau, Blake Hurst, Omnivore’s Delusion

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