The final sin that Faustus commits is sloth Although I recognize this to be the

The final sin that faustus commits is sloth although

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The final sin that Faustus commits is sloth. Although I recognize this to be the last sin that Faustus commits in the play, he commits this sin the most often throughout the play and right before the Devil comes to take him. Not committing this sin would possibly saved Faustus from eternal damnation. His inability to repent is the most
slothful act Faustus commits in the play. He does not give the energy to fully repent and this is his downfall. All of Faustus’ other sins make it easier for him to commit sloth. He acknowledges that he has committed all of the other sins and it makes him lackadaisical about repenting his sins and saving his soul. It is not until Faustus commits every one of the seven deadly sins that he becomes eternally damned. This could suggest that Christopher Marlowe believes in a tolerant and merciful God. “Faustus, repent, yet God will pity thee,” warns the good angel. Dr. Faustus is given numerous warnings throughout his tragic fall yet can never fully heed to the suggestions. His relentless pride and supposed thirst for knowledge disable his senses from seeing salvation from eternal damnation. Faustus, like other tragic figures, can acknowledge his flaw yet cannot bring himself to right the wrong he has committed. In Christian thought, man is only lost to damnation if he is devoid of all faith and does not repent his sinned actions. Faustus cannot be accused of being rid of all his faith due to the angels he encounters throughout his twenty-four soulless years. Many factors

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