The question of freedom arises when the hens are

  • No School
  • AA 1
  • 28970796qqcom
  • 24

This preview shows page 17 - 19 out of 24 pages.

The question of freedom arises when the hens are ordered they “must surrender their eggs” (Orwell 56). At this point, the animals initiate a rebellion because what “they all want is freedom. However, in order to exploit the other animals, Napoleon starts conforming to the standard of Joneses” (Fonseka 9) . So the order for the hens to give up their eggs at the time they were preparing themselves for sitting was, in their eyes, murder. Thus, “for the first time since the expulsion of Jones there was s omething resembling a rebellion” (Orwell 56) , proving that there are limits to which the totalitarian regime is allowed to go. However uneducated animals may be and however easy it was to manipulate them, the idea of murdering their potential offspring triggered their primal instincts. Acording to Akman “freedom is one of the most romantic and ambiguous philosophical words on the world” (78) , so the pigs are using this ambiguity to their advantage by defining freedom as being under the rule of them rather t han under the rule of Man. Hen’s rations are stopped and after five days nine hens have died. The regime masks their deaths, as all totalitarian regimes do, by giving false explanations of the causes. The pigs say that the hens have died of coccidiosis, and the trade with eggs continues as planned. State-ordered murders continued when dogs lashed at the four pigs “as had protested when Napoleon abolished Sunday meetings” (Orwell 61) . Immediately, the frightened pigs confess their crimes and admit they were in league with Snowball, and “when they had finished their confessions the dogs promptly tore their throats out” (Orwell 62) . The regime establishes itself now as violent and murderous, despite the commandment that forbids killing. Pigs show that treachery would not be tolerated and thus prevent any kind of resistance and free thinking in the utopian land. To make things even more tragic, some other animals, afraid of the terrifying dogs, professed to some others minor misbehaviours and were slain on the spot. The animals felt the atrocity of Napoleon s deed because they remembered bloodshed in the old days of Joneses but “it
18 seemed to all of them that it was far worse now that it was happening among themselves” (Orwell 62). By breaking the commandment about killing, the pigs made it obvious that their perfect society was drastically changing. But the deluded animals still thought “that even as things were they were far better off than they had been in the days of Jones” (Orwell 64). In order to justify the murders in the eyes of the animals who remembered that there was a rule against killing another animal, the pigs changed the inscription on the barn by modifying the commandment : “No animal shall kill any other animal without cause ” (Orwell 66) . The pigs have improved their manipulation so much, and animals were so gulible that it became easy to trick them into thinking whatever was necessary. The society they lived in at the time of the murders

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture