2 Agrarian cases Jurisdiction over agrarian cases was transferred from the RTC

2 agrarian cases jurisdiction over agrarian cases was

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2. Agrarian cases Jurisdiction over agrarian cases was transferred from the RTC to the Department of Agriculture. It is taken cognizance of by DARAB which has its own rules of procedure. EVIDENCE MEOW NOTES 3
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3. Rules of Summary Procedure Affidavits take the place of testimonies in court. You cannot testify unless you previously executed an affidavit. 4. Rules of procedure for small claims cases The plaintiff merely fills up a form and files it in the court. He will just wait for the case to be called and the court will receive the testimony right then and there. The defendant then presents evidence and on the next day, a ruling is issued. Sec. 3. Admissibility of evidence. — Evidence is admissible when it is relevant to the issue and is not excluded by the law or these rules. According to Section 3, admissibility of evidence is determined by two factors: 1. It is relevant to the fact in issue; and 2. It is not excluded by law or these rules. Distinguish admissibility of evidence from weight of evidence: Evidence is admissible when it is relevant to the issue and is not excluded by law or the rules. The evidence is admissible when it is considered competent ; whereas weight of the evidence means the credibility of the evidence – whether or not the evidence is believable – subject to the appreciation of the court. Admissibility does not equate to credibility. There mere fact that evidence is admissible does not mean that it is also credible. Credibility depends on the evaluation given to the evidence by the court in accordance with the guidelines provided in the Rules of Court and the doctrines laid down by the Court. (Pp vs. Agripa, 1992). Hence a particular evidence may be admissible but it has no weight. Conversely, evidence may be of great weight or importance but it is not admissible. Admissibility Weight (Credibility) The character or quality which any material must necessarily possess for it to be accepted and allowed to be presented or introduced as evidence in court. It answers the question: should the court allow the material to be used as evidence by the party? The value given or significance or impact, or importance given to the material after it has been admitted; its tendency to convince or persuade. Two axioms or principles which underlie the structure of the law of evidence (conditions of admissibility according to Wigmore): 1. Axiom of relevancy None but facts having a rational probative value are admissible. 2. Axiom of competency All facts having rational probative value are admissible unless some specific rules forbid. PP vs. VALDEZ (2000) FACTS: Valdez was allegedly caught in flagrante delicto and without authority of law, planted, cultivated fully grown marijuana plants. ISSUE: Whether or not the evidence should be admitted.
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