A Literary ElementsStructure B Hines let out a whoop like everyone else and

A literary elementsstructure b hines let out a whoop

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A. Literary Elements—Structure B. “Hines let out a whoop, like everyone else, and dropped my wrist and give a big surge to bust his way in and get a look, and the way I lit out and shinned foor the road in the dark, there ain’t nobody can tell” (170). C. The structure of this piece is the whole adventurous feel of meeting all different kinds of people and taking a tour of what’s around in society that Huck wasn’t even aware of. The different kinds of people really put an interesting aspect to the piece of literature. From meeting so many, Huck is able to see society for what it is, and learn about the outside World. Because he was able to be with the people for some time, he really Because he was able to be with the people for some time, he really got a feel for who they were. He usually went with the flow, but he often did not like some of the ways the groups handled things. This is when he’s escape to his raft on the river to leave, so he could get far away. The main structure of the story is essentially having Huck (and Jim) meet all these new people, get into some mischief, realize that they don’t want to be in the middle of that mischief and run away back to the river and raft. A. Author’s Style—The Room B. “There was a clock on the middle of the mantel-piece, with a picture of a town painted on the bottom half of the glass front…there was a big outlandish parrot on each side of the clock, made out of something like chalk and painted up gaudy…This table had a cover made out of beautiful oil-cloth, with a red and blue spread-eagle painted on it…” (84-85). C. The ripe imagery Mark Twain uses in this section really depicts imagery, really paints a picture for the reader to see. The imagery of the house takes up roughly four pages of complete description. With the section above, the reader can already see the house that Mark Twain held in his imagination. He really does a fantastic job of showing the reader what the house is intended to look like. He really illustrates what the house looks like, with every single detail imaginable. He describes what is on the mantel, piece by piece from the clock to the parrots all around. The fact that the description of the house is about four pages really shows the dedication and style that Mark Twain wanted the reader to notice. A. Author’s Style—Jim’s Dialect B. “’Yo’ ole father doan’ know, yit, what he’s a-gwyne do. Sometimes he spec he’ll go ‘way, en den agin he spec he’ll stay. De bes’ way is to res’ easy en let de ole man take his own way. Dey’s two angels hoverin’ roun’ ‘bout him”’ (17). C. Jim’s dialect was a crucial part to The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn. It was trying to explain the difference between how slaves talked and how non-slaves talked. It’s much harder to
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read Jim’s dialect more than the rest of the characters in the story, which was to depict how we feel about Jim, perhaps giving him more sympathy. Without Jim’s dialect the talking in the book
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