FILTERING Sometimes you want to examine only particular records from a large

Filtering sometimes you want to examine only

This preview shows page 5 - 10 out of 14 pages.

FILTERING Sometimes you want to examine only particular records from a large collection of data. For that, you can use Excel’s Filter tool. On the toolbar, go to the “Data" tab, then click "Filter”. Small buttons will appear at the top of each column: Suppose we wish to see only the records from the Territory of Lazio. Click on the button on the Territery column, uncheck the "Select All" box, and then choose Lazio from the list, like this:
Image of page 5
This is the result: Notice that you now are seeing only rows 36, 44, 78, 80 and 104. The rest are still there, but hidden. More complicated filters are possible. For instance, suppose you wish to see only records in which “Burglaries” is greater than or equal to 5,000 AND car thefts is less than 2,000. You start by filtering Burglaries like this: then this...
Image of page 6
Do the same for Car Thefts, and you get this: FUNCTIONS Excel has many built-in functions useful for performing math calculations and working with dates and text. For instance, assume that we wish to calculate the total number of murders in all the provinces. To do this, we would go to the bottom of Column D, skip a row, and then enter this formula in Cell D106: =SUM(D2:D104). The equals sign (=) is necessary for all functions. The colon (:) means “all the numbers from Cell D2 to Cell D104”. After you hit Enter, the result is this: (The reason for skipping a row is to separate the sum from the main table so that the table can be sorted without pulling the sum into the table during the sorting operation. This way the sum will stay at the bottom of the column.
Image of page 7
Often you will want to do a calculation on each row of your data table. For instance, you might want to calculate the auto theft rate (the number of cars stolen per 100,000 population), which would let you compare the auto theft problem in cities of different sizes. To do this, we would create a new variable called “Car Theft Rate per 100k” in Column J, the first empty column. Then, in Cell J2, we would enter this formula: =(G2/C2)*100000. This divides the stolen cars by the population, then multiplies the result by 100,000. (Notice that there are no spaces and no thousands separators used in the formula.) Here is the result: You can format your numbers using various choices in this box under the "Home" tab: It would be very tedious to repeat writing that calculation in each of 103 rows of data. Happily, Excel has a way to rapidly copy a formula down a column of cells. To do that, you careful move the cursor (normally a big fat white cross) to the dot on the bottom right corner of the cell containing the formula. When it is in the right spot, the cursor will change to a small black cross. At that point, you can double-click and the formula will copy down the column until it reaches a blank cell in the column to the left.
Image of page 8
This would be the result:
Image of page 9
Image of page 10

You've reached the end of your free preview.

Want to read all 14 pages?

  • Spring '18
  • Dr. Moez

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture