Choose one of the books from the reading choices list

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1.Choose one of the books from the reading choices list. If the book contains a collection of poems, select one to analyze. Read it aloud to notice its rhythm. Paraphrase several of its most important lines to make sure you've found all its meaning. Then, in a 400600 word essay, discuss how each of the elements below appears in the poem (if it does):
1.General elements Who is(are) the main character(s), what is the plot, what is the setting, and through what point-of-view is it told?2.Style What rhythm and sound effects are important?3.What kinds of figurative language (personification, metaphors, or similes) does it use? Give examples.4.Tone What attitude(s) does it reveal?5.Compactness What ideas does it condense especially economically?2.Now, select one of Shel Silverstein's poems. You can find many online, or you can choose one from his books listed below. Read the poem aloud to notice its rhythm. Paraphrase several of its most important lines to make sure that you've found all its meaning. Then, in a 400600 word essay, discuss how each of the elements above (a-e) appears in the poem (if it does).Below is a list of some of Silverstein's books:The Giving TreeWhere the Sidewalk EndsA Light in the AtticFall UpThe Missing PieceEverything on ItLafcadioA Giraffe and a HalfRunny BabbitDon't Bump the GlumpDifferent Dances1.Please Bury Me in the Library by Patrick LewisPlease bury me in the LibraryIn the clean, well-lighted stacksOd Novels, History, Poetry,Right next to the paperbacksWhere the Kids' Books danceWith True RomanceAnd the Dictionary dozes.Please bury me in the libraryWith a dozen long-stemmed roses.Why back by a rack of Magazines,I won't be sad too often,If they bury me in the libraryWith Bookworms in my coffin.In “Please Bury Me in the Library” by Patrick Lewis, he expresses a dream and desire to be
buried in the library. But Lewis also expresses his love of written works and presents himself as a book worm through a short and funny poem. I am assuming the main character is the author himself but I am not sure. The poem seems to make any bookworm it’s main character. For people who live and love to read, there is no better idea than to have their final resting place be a library. There is no really distinct plot at all in the poem then besides the constant reminder to the reader to be buried under a library. The setting is a library and the poem is presented through a first-person point of view. The rhythm of meter in the poem is quick and light. The sound pattern is consistent. Lewis uses personification in the second stanza, “Where the Kids’ Books dance” and “And the Dictionary dozes.” This use of figurative language adds to the poem’s playfulness and creates a mental picture for the reader if books actually danced and dozed. The tone of this poem is earnest but light-hearted. This person is such a lover of books and stories and libraries, that they want to be buried somewhere near a dear part of their person. The poem makes light of death as it describes the idea of being buried in a library, constantly surrounded by books and literature. I don’t think this poem is completely compact although it gets to the point. I love the way he begins his poem with “Please bury me in the

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