Moreover Nigeria is largely accustomed to power generation from gas fired power

Moreover nigeria is largely accustomed to power

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Moreover, Nigeria is largely accustomed to power generation from gas-fired power plant due to the country’s natural gas resources potential. The national power generation mix comprises hydro and gas-fired power plant but predominantly natural gas power plant. Besides, there has been a situation in the Nigeria power sector where the current power system infrastructures can no longer deliver half of the total national power demand. The total installed capacity of the country is over 8000MW but available capacity has never reach 4000MW at any time in the history of the nation’s power sector. Phenomenon of sporadic power failures and energy crisis has prevailed over efforts to bridge the gap between power demand and supply scenario. This ugly development is not peculiar to Nigeria alone. Turkson and Wohlgemuth (2001) noted that in the entire region of Sub-Sahara Africa (SSA), provision of reliable power supply is a daunting task taken into account that most of the region is without electricity. According to (Agboola, 2011) the continent’s power sector is in backward situation in the comity of world standard, particularly in West Africa states like Nigeria. The Nigerian power sector started in 1962 as Electricity Corporation of Nigeria (ECN). Niger Dam Authority (NDA) was created later to harness the country’s hydropower resources. The name of the power sector was changed to National Electric Power Authority (NEPA) after the merger of NDA and ECN in 1972. Operating under the name of NEPA, the power sector was granted the monopoly of generation, transmission and distribution of electric power in the country. As a result of general poor performance indices of NEPA, a major reform in the sector known as Electric Power Sector Reform (EPSR) Act was carried-out in 2005. The foremost objective of the reform was to liberate the marketing policy in the sector by breaking the long-time monopoly being enjoyed by the NEPA. The reform led to the establishment of a statutory regulatory commission, Nigerian Electricity Regulatory Commission (NERC) enthrusted with the mandate
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Journal of Energy Technologies and Policy ISSN 2224-3232 (Paper) ISSN 2225-0573 (Online) Vol.2, No.2, 2012 5 to monitor all power generation, transmission and distribution related activities in the nation’s power sector. Independent Power Producer (IPP) participation was supported as part of the reform measures. The reform also endeavors to segregate the entire power system operations into three independent companies comprising six generation, one transmission and eleven distribution companies implemented in 2007. The collection of these independent companies is now called Power Holding Company of Nigeria (PHCN). The reforms are yet to bring any fruitful changes to the situation in the energy sector of the country. Possible exploitation of renewable energy resources particularly from MSW will help to provides primary energy needs of people at household level and for some commercial services. In the region of SSA, Nigerian is well known for bulk importation of commercial diesel based generators. A development that
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