I tell you no man that walks upon the earth shall be

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/ I tell you, no man that walks upon the earth / Shall be rooted out more horribly than you” (Scene 1.415-417). CKreon exclaims to Oedipus’ that his pride is his worst enemy and it turns out that it was (Sophocles, 2016). D“Pride breeds the tyrant violent pride, gorging, crammed to bursting with all that is overripe and rich with ruin—clawing up to the heights, headlongpride crashes down the abyss—sheer doom!” (Ode 2. 963 – 967). VIIConclusion
OEDIPUS: A TRAGIC HEROARestatement of ThesisBSummarize main pointsOver the span of several centuries, dramas and tragedies have impacted entertainment and culture. According to Johnson & Arp (2016), “A tragedy, so Aristotle wrote, is the imitation in dramatic form of an action that is serious and complete, with incidents arousing pity and fear with which it effects a catharsis of such emotions” (p. 1251). From Othello toA Midsummer Night Dream, tragedies have thrilled audiences with their magnificent characters and brilliant playwrights. Amongst these famous tragedies is the play Oedipusby Sophocles. The play begins with a prophecy given to the King and Queen of Thebes that their son (Oedipus) would grow up to kill his father. As a result, the King and Queen sent their son to die on a cliff; however, Oedipus was spared by the Shepard and given to the King and Queen of Corinth to be raised. When he is grown, Oedipus is told by an oracle that he would kill his father and marry his mother. Frightened, Oedipus flees and gets into a confrontation with a man in a chariot that results in Oedipus killing the man and his servants. Later, he encounters the Sphinx’s whohas been terrorizing Thebes and solves her riddle. For his feat, Oedipus is made King of Thebes where he marries his mother and begets children by her. Tragedy strikes when the
OEDIPUS: A TRAGIC HEROKingdome of Thebes is thrown into a famine which leads to Oedipus learning the truth ofhis origin and causing his downfall. Sophocles’ Oedipus exemplifies Aristotle’s definitionof a tragic hero in that he accurately adheres to Aristotle’s conceptions and characteristicsof the tragic protagonist. Aristotle’s Definition of a Tragic Hero/ProtagonistAristotle, a great scientist who lived during the ancient Greek period, developed the theory of rhetoric, constructed several works on psychology, political science, and astronomy (Eagle, 2008). While his accomplishments in other literary and philosophical areas are noteworthy, Aristotle also had an insight into Greek tragedies. According to Johnson & Arp (2016), “Aristotle had important insights into the nature of some of the greatest tragedies and that, rightly or wrongly interpreted, his conceptions are the basis for a kind of archetypal notion of tragedy that has dominated critical thought” (p. 1251). Aristotle had a basis or an outline of characteristics that should be present in a tragic hero. A tragic hero, according to Aristotle, is of noble stature, is good but not perfect, has larger than life qualities, and possess a tragic fall that leads to his downfall while simultaneously evoking a new sense of awareness and discovery (Johnson & Arp, 2016).

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