I felt creeping upon me by slow yet uncertain degrees the wild influence of his

I felt creeping upon me by slow yet uncertain degrees

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which is paralleled by rodrick ("Rationally Usher's condition terrified, it infected me... I felt creeping upon me, by slow yet uncertain degrees, the wild influence of his own fantastic yet impressive superstitions."), compared to his somewhat uneasy self at the beginning of the story. This parallel creates horror around the character and shows how a normal person can descend into madness based on the environment. This can also be attributed to the house itself, which further supports the idea of the house being a consuming entity itself, and by entering and staying in the house the narrator is exposing himself to being consumed by the insanity and disparity inside. By having the narrator experience unpleasant truths and phenomenon ( He sees a face in the tarn, a split fissure in the house and the double image of his own face superimposed on the death's head image of the house) it develops the horror further by having a normal man experience supernatural things, and question if they are actually real, giving the reader the same sense of fear the narrator does after trying to dismiss them as natural things. Looking into the dark imagination where fantasy becomes reality is to evoke madness. That is why Roderick twice refers to the narrator as "Madman" in the final scene. The narrator has made a journey into the underworld of the mind and is nearly destroyed by it, however, he manages to escape and turns to watch as the "House of Usher" crumbles into "...the deep and dank tarn."
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