bulk of the power should be retained by the states 1 There the people in

Bulk of the power should be retained by the states 1

This preview shows page 24 - 26 out of 26 pages.

bulk of the power should be retained by the states 1. There the people, in intimate contact with local affairs, could keep a more vigilant eye on their public; central authority  was to be kept at a minimum through a strict interpretation of  the Constitution; the national debt was to be paid off
Image of page 24
2. Jeffersonian Republicans insisted that there should  be no special privileges for special classes, particularly  manufacturers—agriculture was the favored branch of economy 3. Above all, Jefferson advocated the rule of the people;  he favored government for the people, but not by all the people —only by those men who were literate enough 4. Universal education would have to precede universal  suffrage and the ignorant were thus incapable of self- government; he had faith in the masses and collective wisdom 6. Landlessness among American citizens threatened popular  democracy like illiteracy; he feared that the propertyless dependents would be political pawns in the hands of their landowning superiors;  how could the emergence of a landless class of voters be avoided? 1. The answer, in part, was by slavery—a system of  black slave labor in the South ensured that white yeoman  farmers could remained independent landowners 2. Without slavery, poor whites would have to provide  the cheap labor so necessary for the cultivation of tobacco and  rice, and their low wages would preclude their ever owning  property; Jefferson thus tortuously reconciled slaveholding with  democracy 7. Jefferson’s confidence that white, free men could become  responsible and knowledgeable citizens was open-minded; he  championed their freedom of speech, for without free speech, the  misdeeds of tyranny could not be expose 8. Jeffersonian Republicans were basically pro-French; the  earnestly believed that it was to America’s advantage to support the liberal ideals of the French Revolution 9. So as the young Republic’s first full decade of nationhood  came to a close, the Founders’ hopes seemed already imperiled;  conflicts over domestic politics and foreign policy undermined the  unity of the Revolutionary era and called into question viability
Image of page 25
10.As the presidential election of 1800 approached, the dangerloomed that the fragile and battered American ship of state would founder on the rocks of controversy
Image of page 26

You've reached the end of your free preview.

Want to read all 26 pages?

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture