Transformations of islam pp 127 137 in mcneil and

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“Transformations of Islam” (pp. 127-137) in McNeil and McNeil’sThe Human Web: A Bird’s Eye Viewof World History.Morillo, Stephen. "Guns and Government: A Comparative Study of Europe and Japan."Journal of WorldHistory6, no. 1 (1995): 75-106.May, Timothy. “Mongols in World History.”World History Connected5, no. 2 (2008).Special Focus Activities:Map Exercise: Students use three blank outline maps of Eurasia to trace the Silk Road and trade routes onthe Indian Ocean and color in empires in three different time periods. This activity emphasizes how thechanging contexts of political empires affected trade and why the Mecca and Camel Caravan routesbecame much more important as trade shifted from land-based to ocean-based trade.[CR9]14
AP®World History: Sample Syllabus 2Syllabus 1408166v1Simulation Role-Play – Indian Ocean Trade: Students work in small groups competing to make the mostprofits trading different grouping of goods. This activity emphasizes what goods were profitable and whysome goods were traded and others not.Socratic Seminar – International Religious Communities: Students read a selection of primary sourcedocuments from Wiesner-Hanks’Discovering the Global Past. The students discuss the role of religion inmaintaining trade and reasons for conversion. This discussion should emphasize the role of universalreligions taking the place of classical empires.Paired Debate: Students will have a Paired Debate on document reliability using excerpts from “OnBuildings” and “The Secret History” by Procopius. Students debate which document is most reliable andwhy. This activity practices historical argumentation.Essays (Three):Compare and Contrast Essay (2005): Compare and contrast the political and economic effects of theMongol rule on two of the following regions: China, Middle East, and/or Russia.Continuity and Change Over Time Essay (CCOT) (2009): Analyze the continuities and changes inpatterns of interactions along the Silk Roads from 200 B.C.E. to 1450 C.E.Document-Based Question (2004): Analyze the responses to the spread of Buddhism in China.[CR16][CR9]— Students are provided opportunities to situate historical events, developments, or processes within thebroader regional, national, or global context in which they occurred. — Contextualization (Proficiency Skill C3)[CR16]— Students are provided opportunities to develop written arguments that have a thesis supported by relevanthistorical evidence that is organized in a cohesive way. — Argumentation (Proficiency Skills E2, E3, E4)Period 4: Global Interactions, 1450 C.E. to 1750 C.E.Key Concepts:4.1 Globalizing Networks of Communication and Exchange4.2 New Forms of Social Organization and Modes of Production4.3 State Consolidation and Imperial ExpansionKey Topics:CaravelPrince HenryColumbusRoyal Charter companiesMercantilismJoint stock companiesColumbian exchangePotatoesMaizeVodunThe Palace of VersaillesEncomiendaHacienda15
AP®World History: Sample Syllabus 2Syllabus 1408166v1CreoleDaimyoSafavidCasta paintingsGunpowderManchuMughalOttoman

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