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B yes because the ability of new mutations to add

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B. Yes, because the ability of new mutations to add variation is stronger than the force of genetic drift. C. Yes, because both drift and new mutations help add variation in this population. D. No, because the ability of new mutations to add variation is far less than the force of genetic drift. E. No, because natural selection will always cause one allele to go to fixation, resulting in little genetic variation. Reset Selection Mark for Review What's This? Question 4 of 4 4.0 Points Starting with the same population of 10 haploid sea urchins, where 1 has the W allele and 9 have the P allele, assume now that the W allele has a strong selective advantage. Sea urchin offspring with the W allele are 9 times more likely to survive than offspring with the P allele. What is the probability that the P allele will fix in the very next generation? A. 0.9 B. 0.5 C. 0.5 10 D. 0.9 10 E. 0.9 X 0.1 F. None of the above Reset Selection Mark for Review What's This? Part 3 of 7 - General Question 1 of 5 4.0 Points The classic example of peppered moths being impacted by new environmental constraints demonstrates what? Pick ALL that apply: A. Directional selection, where one allele is favored over the other. B. Genetic drift causing a change in allele and genotype frequencies. C. A population bottleneck, where a catastrophic event randomly wipes out most moths, but by chance happens to leave more black moths than peppered moths. D. Adaptation to new selective pressures, given the rise of factories that produced ash and soot immediately after the Industrial Revolution. E. A population conforming to Hardy-Weinberg Equilibrium. F. Parallel evolution, where all white moths evolved to become black moths independent of each other. G. Natural selection, where a previously low-frequency trait suddenly confers a higher fitness. H. Fixation of the black color allele within one generation following the introduction of the selection pressure. I. Mutation, which introduced the black color allele to the population after the Industrial Revolution.
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4/12/13 6:34 PM 2013 Problem Set 2 on Evolution Lectures 4-6 Page 3 of 10 https://coursework.stanford.edu/portal/tool/1c2f43e9-1653-4e97-98f7-93a4fbb2cb09/jsf/delivery/beginTakingAssessment Mark for Review What's This? Question 2 of 5 4.0 Points In a large population, one would NOT expect that? Pick ALL that apply: A. Selection will be more efficient than in smaller populations. B. The rate of fixation of neutral mutations will be lower than in smaller populations. C. There will be more total mutations per generation than in smaller populations. D. There will be more genetic variation than in smaller populations. Mark for Review What's This? Question 3 of 5 4.0 Points In which of the following examples would you expect natural selection to dominate over genetic drift? Pick ONE BEST choice: A. A population of 70 unicorns has an even mix of red, orange, yellow, green, blue, indigo, and violet coat colors. There is no selection on coat color and they mate randomly, but after a few dozen generations, there are 35 red and 35 yellow unicorns.
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B Yes because the ability of new mutations to add variation...

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