Socioeconomic Status an individuals position in a stratified social order

Socioeconomic status an individuals position in a

This preview shows page 7 - 8 out of 34 pages.

can allow for upward class mobility as a household's wealth increases. Socioeconomic Status:  an individual’s position in a stratified social order. Refers to any  measure that attempts to classify groups, individuals, families, or households in terms of  indicators such as occupation, income, wealth, and education. Poverty:  the condition of not having access to material resources, income, or wealth.   Contradictory class locations:  the idea that people can occupy locations in the class  structure that fall between the two “pure” classes. Strata: Equality:  the quality or state of having the same rights, social status, etc.  Inequality:  an unfair, not equal, state.  Gentrification:  the process of renewal and rebuilding accompanying the influx of middle-class  or affluent people into deteriorating areas that often displaces poorer residents Underclass:  the notion, building on the culture of poverty argument, that the poor not only are  different from mainstream society in their inability to take advantage of what mainstream  society has to offer but also are increasingly deviant and even dangerous to the rest of us. Feminization of poverty:  the feminization of poverty refers to the fact that women represent a disproportionate share of the world’s poor. It is not only a consequence of lack of income, but  is also the result of the deprivation of opportunities and gender biases present in both societies and governments. Women’s increasing share of poverty is related to the rising incidence of  lone-mother households. Women in poverty have reduced access to health care services and  resources.  Prestige:  widespread respect and admiration felt for someone or something on the basis of a  perception of their achievements or quality.  4. What are the various forms of equality? Which ones are preferable? What is inequality? Ontological equality:  the notion that everyone is created equal at birth. This notion is often  used to justify material inequality by asserting that the distribution of power and resources here of earth dos not matter, because all of us are equally children of God and will have to face our  maker upon dying. It is also sometimes used to put forth the notion that poverty is a virtue.  Equality of Opportunity:  the idea that everyone has an equal chance to achieve wealth,  social prestige, and power because the rules of the game, so to speak, are the same for  everyone. For example, the game of Monopoly follows the rules of equality of opportunity  because everyone had an equal chance at the start. This is the standard model for what  equality means in a bourgeois society.   Equality of Condition:  the idea that everyone should have an equal starting point. An 
Image of page 7

Want to read all 34 pages?

Image of page 8

Want to read all 34 pages?

You've reached the end of your free preview.

Want to read all 34 pages?

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture