Likewise if the ac utility voltage goes below 92

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that's way too high a voltage or we're going to damage equipment. Likewise, if the AC utility voltage goes below 92 volts, then we're going to again kick over onto battery. If the AC power runs between these two values, between 92 volts and 139 volts, then we're going to just use the AC power and let the batteries charge. So at this point, we've configured our UPS settings using the PowerChute application. Before we end, I want to talk about one other key issue. And that relates to the Estimated Battery Time down here. Now this Estimated Battery Time assumes that there is one PC connected to this UPS. So if I have a power outage, I'll get about 131 minutes of use out of the battery before I'm going to have to shut the system down. Now this is an optimal situation, where there's just one computer system connected to the UPS. In reality, you know what really happens? People connect lots of different devices to the protective ports on the UPS. They may connect two or three computer systems to the UPS. They may connect their network equipment through the UPS. Which is not a bad idea, by the way. The problem here is that the more devices you add to the UPS, the less battery time you're going to get in the case of a power outage. For example, if I connected two computer systems to this UPS, I will get 50% of the battery time, because I'm drawing twice as much power. So I'd probably get around 65 minutes or so of battery time. If I connected three systems, I would divide the number of minutes by three, if I connected four systems, I would divide it by four and so on. So be very careful about how many systems you plug into the protective port on the UPS and make sure that you're going to get adequate time to shut the systems down cleanly if a power outage occurs. Also be aware that there's an ongoing debate as to whether you should plug your monitor into the UPS as well. I actually prefer to do that, even though it will reduce my estimated battery time, I'm still able to see the screen and do certain things like save my document that I'm currently working on. If I don't have my monitor plugged in to the UPS, then I can't see what's going on. The computer does stay running but I can't do anything! I can't see the save button, I can't close my application, and so on. So I like to plug the monitor in, but be aware that doing so will reduce your battery time because monitors actually do consume quite a bit of power. Now there is one thing that you should never ever connect to a protected outlet on your UPS and that is a laser printer. That's because laser printers use heating elements and these heating elements,when you send a print job, consume a lot of electricity. It's kind of like turning on a hair dryer in your house. You've probably noticed that if you turn on a hair dryer in your home, your lights may actually dim slightly while the hair dryer is running. Well about the same thing happens when the heating element inside of your laser printer turns on. And it will drain your battery fast. So
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do not plug the laser printer into a protected outlet on the UPS. I will mention, however, that inkjet printers don't use nearly as much power and it's
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