EECS
Data Summative.docx

Students with household incomes within 20000 40000

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correspond with level of importance (1 = Not Important, 2 = Somewhat Important, etc.). Students with household incomes within $20,000 - $40,000 had an average rank of 4 which translates to family being very important to them. This was our highest rank and shows that these students care for family more than other priorities. Surveyors with household incomes within intervals $40,000 - $60,000 and $60,000 - $80,000 both averaged a rank of 3 which means they consider family to be important but not their very top priority. Surveyors with household incomes within intervals $80,000 - $100,000, $100,000 - $120,000, and $120,000 - $140,000 all averaged a rank of 2 which corresponds to family being somewhat important. Lastly, the lowest average rank of 1 belongs to surveyors with household incomes of $140,000 and more which means they do not consider family to be important at all. Our data produced a strong, negative correlation between income and importance of family since the value of r is 0.935 which is very close to 1. This concludes that students with a higher household income may consider occupation and money more important than family. - Socio-Economic Status vs. How Well the Students Get Along With Their Siblings We decided to include a graph about the surveyors’ relationship with their siblings since it
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determines whether there's a good bond and trust between members of the family. In order to make this variable measurable, we chose a number to correspond with how well surveyors get along with their siblings (1 = Never, 2 = Sometimes, etc.). Surveyors with household incomes within $20,000 - $40,000 averaged a rank of 2 which means they moderately get along with their siblings. The highest rank of 3 was averaged by surveyors with household incomes within $40,000 - $60,000 which shows they get along with their siblings quite well. Surveyors with household incomes between $60,000 - $80,000 averaged a rank of 2.5 which means they sometimes to always get along with their siblings. Students with household incomes within the intervals $80,000 - $100,000 and $100,000 - $120,000 both average a rank of 1.5 which means that these students hardly ever get along with their siblings but do however have some good moments together. Lastly, surveyors with household incomes within intervals $120,000 - $140,000 and $140,000+ averaged a rank of 1 which shows that they hardly ever get along with their siblings. This was also the lowest rank in our data. Overall we concluded that students with a lower socioeconomic status get along better with their siblings compared to students with a higher socioeconomic status. Unknown / Sub Variables: - Personality Types
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One of our hidden/sub variables is whether the student considers themselves to be either an extrovert or introvert. By questioning the surveyor if they are an introvert or not, it takes into consideration the student’s personality, by doing this it makes sure that the family’s socioeconomic status is the sole independent variable in determining the strength of the family’s bonds. Our results showed that 36 out of 60 students considered themselves to be introverts, which is 60% of our sample. While 24 out of 60 students considered themselves to be extroverts, which is 40% of our sample size. However, after looking at our results, we came to a conclusion that personality
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  • Fall '18
  • Household income in the United States, FAMILY RELATIONS

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