Biff inquires constantly about willys job whered you

This preview shows page 9 - 11 out of 11 pages.

Biff inquires constantly about Willy’s job, “Where’d you go this time, Dad?” and “What’d he say?”. And he tells his father, “Gee, I’d love to go with you sometime, Dad.” We can clearly see Biff’s affection for his father from his telling Willy that Biff and Happy ‘were lonesome for [him]’ and ‘missed [him] every minute.’ Biff’s relationship with his father deteriorates after the incident at Boston where he witnesses Willy’s affair and betrayal to his mother. When Biff first returns home, his animosity for his father can be seen through his dialogue with Happy and Linda. “Stop making excuses for him! He always, always wiped the floor with you. Never had an ounce of respect for you.” Instead of defending his father, Biff is quick to attack saying, “People are worse off than Willy Loman. Believe me, I’ve seen them!” However, when Linda begins to defend Willy, Biff calms down a bit, settling for a negotiation in which he will “live [t]here in [his] room, and get a job. [And] keep away from him, that’s all.” In addition, Biff goes into logistics, saying “He’ll settle for half my pay check. He’ll be all right.” This in itself shows that Biff does not regard Willy as his father, rather, as a mere person, almost a stranger. Biff’s looking highly upon his father and treating Willy as someone personal to him no longer exists, compared to his childhood days. We see another proof of the worsening relationship when Biff exclaims to Linda, “[Because] I know he’s a fake and he doesn’t like anybody around who knows!” Willy’s image in Biff’s mind has tragically gone from a respectful, well-spoken man (“He’d like you, Pop. You know the way you could talk.”) to a phony (“You fake! You phony little fake! You fake!.”). The relationship between Happy and Biff is that of brothers. Happy, Biff’s younger brother, is a minor character that serves as a buffer in the story. Like his name suggests, he is always striving for peace and no tensions within his family and family relations. He is also very optimistic, which sometimes come off as naive and too hopeful. When Biff tells Linda that Willy ‘never had an ounce of respect for’ her, Happy immediately retorts, “He’s always had respect for--.” He does this in hopes of intervening and stopping the conflict. And even when he
becomes overridden by Biff’s accusations, Happy keeps defending Willy. “Just don’t call him crazy!” he yells. In this optimistic manner, Happy serves as a contrast to Biff. While Biff searches for himself and comes to accept himself for who he is, Happy remains optimistic about life and does not search for himself. This brings out Biff’s character and reestablishes Biff’s accepting of his reality. Bernard is a minor character that serves as a foil to the character Biff, for he represents the fulfilled American Dream. He studied hard and worked his way up to be a successful lawyer, as he was “gonna argue a case in front of the Supreme Court.”. As Biff’s childhood friend, Bernard pushed Biff to make up lost credits so that Biff would be able to graduate and attend the college of his dreams, “Biff, where are you? You’re supposed to study with me today.” Bernard became

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture