Medication history disease or injury history history

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Medication history. Disease or injury history. History of pain relief measures, including medications, supplements, exercise, massage, complementary and alternative therapies (“What makes it better or worse?”) (Anderson, 2013; American Pain Society, 2007; Oregon Pain Commission, 2012). Functional and Psychosocial Assessment
Material protected by copyright Components of the functional and psychosocial assessment include: Reports of patient’s prior level of function. Observation of patient’s behaviors while performing functional tasks. Patient or family’s report of impact of pain on activities of daily living, including work, self-care, exercise, and leisure. Patient’s goal for pain management and level of function. Patient or family’s report of impact of pain on quality of life. Cultural and developmental considerations. History of pain in relation to depression, abuse, psychopathology, chemical or alcohol use. Impact of pain on patient’s cognitive abilities (Anderson, 2013; American Pain Society, 2007; Oregon Pain Commission, 2012). Test Yourself History components that are required as part of assessment include: History of substance use History of medications Medical history All of the above - Correct! Multidimensional Assessment Many tools are available for an in-depth, multidimensional pain assessment. This is particularly important with patients that have chronic pain, mixed pain (both acute and chronic), or complex situations (such as multiple disease processes). Common examples of these tools include: Brief Pain Inventory: Provides patient input in describing pain and effects, including psychosocial components. Can be viewed here. McGill Pain Questionnaire: Patients can use descriptors for their pain, which provides information about the experience and intensity. The questionnaire can be viewed here. Pain: Verbal Reports Conducting an in-depth pain assessment will assist you in developing a comprehensive pain management plan. If patients are able to communicate, it is import to incorporate verbal reports of pain using descriptions and/or appropriate tools. Pain must be assessed and recorded in a manner that promotes reassessment. By using the acronym PQRST, you can easily and confidently perform and document a comprehensive pain assessment. Provocative or Palliative: What makes the pain better or worse? Quality: Describe the pain. Is it burning, shooting, aching, stabbing, crushing, etc.?Radiation: Does the pain radiate to another body part?Severity: Use appropriate pain scale to determine severity of painTiming: Does it occur in association with something else? (e.g. eating, exertion, movement).Provocation or Palliative Symptoms Assessment of provocative or palliative symptoms gives you clues to the origin of pain. Ask the
Material protected by copyright patient what makes the pain better or worse. For example, exertion may intensify anginal pain and rest may alleviate it. Movement of an injured body part may intensify pain while applying heat or cold

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