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Of resource managerialism in many ways have not

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of resource managerialism in many ways have not changed over the past century. At best, this code of practice has only becomemore formalized in many governments' applications and legal interpretations. Working with the managerial vision of the secondindustrial revolution, which tended to empower technical experts like engineers or scientists, who had gotten their degrees fromagricultural schools, mining schools, technology schools like the one I work at, Virginia Polytechnic Institute, which prides itself asthey say on producing the worker bees of industry. Or, on the shop floor and professional managers, one found corporate executivesand financial officers in the main office, who are of course trained in business schools. Put together, resource managerialism castscorporate administrative frameworks over nature in order to find the supplies needed to feed the economy and provision societythrough national and international markets. As scientific forestry, range management, and mineral extraction took hold in the U.S.during this era, an ethos of battling scarcity guided professional training, corporate profit making, and government policy. As a result,the operational agendas of what was called sustained yield were what directed the resource managerialism of the 20th century. Inreviewing the enabling legislation of key federal agencies, one quickly discovers that the values and practices of resourcificationanchor their institutional missions in a sustained yield philosophy. As Cortner and Moote observe, the statutory mandates for boththe Forest Service, the Multiple Use Sustained Yield Act, and the National Forest Management Act, and the Bureau of LandManagement, the Federal Land Policy and Management Act, for example, specifically direct these agencies to employ a multiple usesustained yield approach to resource management. More often than not, however, these agencies adjusted their multiple useconcept to correspond to their primary production objective -- timber in the case of the Forest Service, grazing in terms of theBureau of Land Management. Although sustained help is not specifically mentioned in the legislated mandate of agencies such as theNational Parks Service or the Bureau of Reclamation, they too have traditionally managed for maximum sustained yield of a singleresource - visitor use in the case of the parks, water supply in the case of water resources. So the ethos of resourcification imaginednature as a vast input/output system.The mission statements of sustained yield pushed natural resourcemanagement towards realizing the maximum maintainable output up to or past even the pointwhere one reached ecological collapse, which in turn of course caused wide-spread ecologicaldegradation, which leads to the project of rehabilitation managerialism.The acknowledgement ofecological degradation is not tremendously difficult. Indeed, the will to manage environments arises from this wide-spreadrecognition back in the 19th century. One obvious outcome of building and then living around the satanicmills of modern industrial capitalism was pollution

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Term
Spring
Professor
N/A
Tags
Biodiversity, National security

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