Widescreen ratios most common in north america 1851

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Widescreen ratios; most common in north america 1.85:1 The simplest way to create a widescreen image is by masking it at some stage in production or exhibition. Anamorphic Process is when a special lens squeezes the image horizontally, either during filming or in printing. Deviation from rectangular filming can be done by attaching masks over the printer's lens to block the passage of light, masks were quite common in the silent cinema. If framing is tipped to one side or the other, is is said to be canted. In the extreme long shot, the human is lost or tiny. In the long shot, figures are more prominent, but the background still dominates. Shots in which the human figure is framed from about the knees up are called medium long shots.
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The medium shot frames the human body from the waist up. The medium close up frames the body from the chest up. The close up is traditionally the shot showing just the head, hands, feet, or a small object. The extreme close up singles out a portion of the face or isolates and magnifies an object. Camera distance, height, level, and angle often take on clear-cut narrative functions. The pan movement rotates the camera on a vertical axis. The tilt movement rotates the camera on a horizontal axis. The tracking or dolly shot is where the camera as a whole does change position, traveling in any direction along the ground – forward, backward, circularly, etc. Handheld cameras produce jiggling, shacking images The tracking shots and the crane shots do enlarge or reduce portions of the frame. The mobile frame also continually affects the angle, level, height, or distance of the framing. Frame mobility functions primarily to keep our attention fastened on the subject of the shot, and it subordinates itself to that subject's movement. Sudden zooms from the camera frequent abrupt shifts of perspective relations. A long take is is a lengthy take from one run on the camera recording a single shot. Panning, tracking, craning, or zooming can be used to present continually changing vantage points that are comparable in some ways to the shifts of view supplied by editing. Chapter 6 Notes Editing may be thought of as the coordination of one shot with the next. A fade out gradually darkens the end of a shot to black, and a fade-in accordingly lightens a shot from black. A dissolve briefly superimposes the end of shot A and the beginning of shot B. Dimensions of Film Editing Graphic relations between shot A and B: editing together any two shots that permit the interaction, through similarity and difference, of the purely pictorial qualities of those two shots. Editing allows the filmmaker to determine the duration of each shot, when the filmmakers adjust the length of shots in relation to one another, she or he is controlling the rhythmic potential of editing.
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  • Fall '10
  • WALTERKORTE
  • Shot, Film editing

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