revised_tv_crime_article_jan_2016_002_.doc

Conceptualising a genre such as crime television one

Info icon This preview shows pages 14–16. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
that can be seen to organise crime as a generic content within television. Conceptualising a genre such as crime television – one defined most often by particular sorts of content – through modes that overlap and inflect each other, represents an important strategy for understanding the diversity and flexibility of the category. Moreover, action/crime is far from the only successful variant typically overlooked by existing scholarship. Indeed as the example of action/crime suggests, textual genre work – analyses that foreground formal as much as contextual factors – have much to gain from an understanding of genre as fluid and modal. Yvonne Tasker is Professor of Film and Media Studies, and Dean of Faculty of Arts and Humanities at the University of East Anglia. Her research is broadly concerned with the politics of popular culture. In current and recent work Yvonne has explored these issues in relation to popular constructions of “postfeminism”; gender and military culture on screen; action and adventure narratives; and crime television. References Ascari, Maurizio A. 2007. Counter-History of Crime Fiction: Supernatural, Gothic, Sensational . London. Palgrave. Buscombe, Ed. and Roberta E. Pearson, eds. 1998. Back in the Saddle Again: new essays on the western . London. BFI. Butler, Jeremy G. 2010. Television Style . London. Routledge. Cohan, Steven. 2008. CSI . London. BFI. Cuklanz Liza M. and Sujata Moorti. 2006. “Television’s “New” Feminism: Prime-time representations of women and victimization.” Critical Studies in Media Communication . 23 (4): 302-321. Fishman, Mark and Gray Cavender, eds. 1998. Entertaining Crime: Television Reality Programs . New York. Aldine De Gryter. Gunning, Tom. 1986. “The Cinema of Attraction: Early Film, Its Spectator and the Avant- Garde.” Wide Angle. 3 (4): 63-70. 14
Image of page 14

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Lee, Susanna. 2003. ‘“These Are Our Stories”: Trauma, Form, and the Screen Phenomenon of Law & Order ,’ Discourse. 25 (1/2): 81-97. Lichtenfeld, Eric. 2007. Action Speaks Louder: Violence, Spectacle and the American Action Movie . Middletown. Wesleyan University Press. Lotz, Amanda D. 2006. Redesigning Women: Television After the Network Era . Urbana and Chicago. University of Illinois Press. Lyons, James. 2010. Miami Vice . Wiley-Blackwell. Mittell, Jason. 2004. Genre and Television: From Cop Shows to Cartoons in American Culture . New York. Routledge. Mittell, Jason. 2006. “Narrative Complexity in Contemporary American Television.” The Velvet Light Trap . 58 (3): 29-40. James Oliphant “Starsky and Hutch : The Complete First Season” Pop Matters 2004, http://www.popmatters.com/review/starsky-and-hutch-season-1/ . Last accessed 1 st February 2016. Quinn, Laura. 2002. “The Politics of Law and Order,” Journal of American and Comparative Cultures 25 (1/2): 130-134. Rapping, Elayne. 2003. Law and Justice as Seen on TV , New York University Press. Sadoul, Georges. 1946. “Early Film production in England: The Origin of Montage, Close- ups, and Chase Sequence.” Hollywood Quarterly . 1(3): 249-259.
Image of page 15
Image of page 16
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

{[ snackBarMessage ]}

What students are saying

  • Left Quote Icon

    As a current student on this bumpy collegiate pathway, I stumbled upon Course Hero, where I can find study resources for nearly all my courses, get online help from tutors 24/7, and even share my old projects, papers, and lecture notes with other students.

    Student Picture

    Kiran Temple University Fox School of Business ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    I cannot even describe how much Course Hero helped me this summer. It’s truly become something I can always rely on and help me. In the end, I was not only able to survive summer classes, but I was able to thrive thanks to Course Hero.

    Student Picture

    Dana University of Pennsylvania ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    The ability to access any university’s resources through Course Hero proved invaluable in my case. I was behind on Tulane coursework and actually used UCLA’s materials to help me move forward and get everything together on time.

    Student Picture

    Jill Tulane University ‘16, Course Hero Intern