Ii web pages should always be saved into a folder

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ii) Web pages should always be saved into a folder . (Teacher note: Help your students by having them create a folder at the point they save their documents. All files related to the Web page need to be organized into this folder) iii) A simple website could be organized in just one folder, but large websites need to be organized in some manner. iv) Large websites typically create folders and subfolders contained within the root folder. v) Relative links are located relative to the current document because the server knows the location of the current document. vi) A relative link will look like this: (also known as a directory path) <a href="/photos/photogallery.html">Home</a> vii) An absolute link defines the location of the document in total including the protocol required to get the document, the server to get it from, the directory it is located in and then the name of the document itself. viii) An absolute link will look like this: (1) <a href=" ">Home</a> 2) HTML Overview a) HyperText Markup Language is the primary language for building/creating web pages. b) HTML uses markup tags which describe or define content in a Web document. (It is not a scripting or a programming language) c) HTML documents contain HTML tags and plain text which are often simply called web pages. d) HTML code is often referred to as source code . e) HTML can be coded using a plain text editor . f) When using a text editor, save the HTML document using the file extension . html or .htm g) Rules for HTML tags (syntax) i) HTML tags are enclosed inside angle brackets: < >. ii) The tag name is keyed between the two angle brackets. Example: <body>. iii) With a few exceptions, tags occur in pairs with an opening and a closing tag. Example <body> </body> BD10 Multimedia and Webpage Design Summer 2015 Page 189
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iv) The opening <body> indicates the start of the body section and the closing </body> marks the end of the body section. v) The forward slash (/) always precedes the tag name in a closing tag. The closing tag is written like the start tag but with the forward slash before the tag name. </body> vi) The text between the HTML tags is keyed in plain text vii) The following tags do not have pairs and are often called “empty tags”: <br>, <hr>, <img>, <meta> (These tags do not have information that you would put between an opening and closing tag) viii) While HTML tags are not case sensitive, they are generally keyed in all lowercase letters. h) An HTML element consists of everything between the start tag and the end tag including the tags. For example: <h1>This is heading style 1</h1> i) An HTML attribute gives elements additional meaning and context. For example: <img src=”team.jpg” alt=”team photo”> j) The image tag requires the src (source) attribute and the alt (alternative) attribute. The required alt attribute specifies an alternate text for an image, if the image cannot be displayed. The user defines the text in the alt tag.
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