5 the flogging of the officers firstly the fact that

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5. The flogging of the officers Firstly, the fact that the police officers were beaten for something as minor as a complaint for stealing clothes (or attempting to) lacks common sense. Those who enforce the law and are meant to control violent behaviour should not be the ones employing these methods themselves. Secondly, the third officer was open to being beat, claiming that they deserved it for their actions. It is in no part of human nature to willingly submit to pain, it lacks common sense for one to be asking to be beat. Thirdly, the whip-man seemed to be excited and urgent to beat the policemen, and it was done in front of K as well instead of in private. It lacks common sense that one would want to commit such horrid torture in front of another person. Fourthly, K is willing to surrender substantial amounts of his money in order to spare 2 corrupt officers who attempted to steal from him. This hardly makes sense as it is human nature to want to see those who wronged you, get punished. It is peculiar that K is willing to pay in order to spare people whom he has no correlation with. Lastly, despite K’s attempt to bribe the whip-man, he shoos away the servitors who could have intervened and stop the incident. It doesn’t make sense for K to pity the officers before, but all of a sudden be unwilling to save them now. 6. K’s visit to his lawyer.
Firstly, K’s uncle seems to be excessively worried and anxious over the matter, whereas K is very relaxed and tame. Common sense would lead one to believe the accused would be in shambles whereas the lawyer would be calm and collected. Secondly, his uncle suggests that K leave the premises and go live in the country with him temporarily. This also does not make sense, as it would exhibit a sense of guilty and complicate things even further. Thirdly, K’s uncle suggests that they pay a visit to a cheap lawyer to assist in his case. The lawyer was very ill, however, upon hearing that the case was not for his uncle, but for K himself, the lawyer changed his mind. The author describes the instance as a sudden burst of life, and the lawyer agrees to help although he may not outlast the case before he dies. Fourthly, it was peculiar that the lawyer who had been ill in bed somehow knew all about K’s case. Similar to previous instances in which individuals knew things they could have not rationally known; it lacks common sense. Lastly, the lawyer’s carer drew K out of the lawyer’s room and seemed to have attempted to seduce him. Another theme in the book that lacks common sense, is women’s attraction to K, it seems that all women, regardless of their circumstance seem to be drawn to K.

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