As with many treaties bef this one the federal government found a way to break

As with many treaties bef this one the federal

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this one, the federal government found a way to break this one too, with an aide to President Nixon stating that “treaty making with the Indians ended in 1871, 102 years ago” (Johnson). In the end, the final battle of the Indian Wars faded into a forgotten history; one that few Americans have heard of yet happened not even a half a century ago. Though the three major players, Dennis Banks, Richard Wilson, and President Nixon, have since passed, Wounded Knee should serve as a reminder that no past injustices are ever truly forgotten.ReferencesJohansen, Bruce E. "Richard Wilson." The American Mosaic: The American Indian Experience, ABC-CLIO, 2019, americanindian2.abc-clio.com/Search/Display/1384870. Accessed 9 Apr. 2019.Johnson, Troy R. "Wounded Knee Occupation (1973)." The American Mosaic: The American Indian Experience, ABC-CLIO, 2019, americanindian2.abc-clio.com/Search/Display/1385400. Accessed 9 Apr. 2019.Laird, Gwendolyn, and Roger Chapman. "Wounded Knee Incident." Culture Wars in America: An Encyclopedia of Issues, Viewpoints, and Voices, edited by James Ciment, Routledge, 2nd edition, 2013. Credo Reference, -
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com.ezproxy1.apus.edu/content/entry/sharpecw/wounded_knee_incident/0. Accessed 09 Apr. 2019.McGuire, William, and Leslie Wheeler. "Dennis Banks." The American Mosaic: The American Indian Experience, ABC-CLIO, 2019, americanindian2.abc-clio.com/Search/Display/1385556. Accessed 9 Apr. 2019.
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  • The American, Native Americans in the United States, Lakota people, Wounded Knee

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