with the Bair Paws warming unit combined with intra operative warming was

With the bair paws warming unit combined with intra

This preview shows page 5 - 6 out of 7 pages.

with the Bair Paws warming unit combined with intra-operative warming was compared with applying a BairHugger alone intraoperatively.Results showed a significant effect of time on tempera-ture,as well as a significant effect of each interventionacross 3 time periods: preoperative, intraoperative, andPACU. However, there was no statistically significantdifference between the 2 interventions with respect tobody temperature over time. In addition, analyses in-dicated that type of procedure did not affect body tem-perature over time. No statistically significant differencewith respect to body temperature over time was foundbetween patients who underwent either laparoscopic oropen gynecologic procedures. The effect of ASA classon body temperature over time showed similar results.Furthermore, none of the patients were hypothermie inthe PACU. All of the subjects' had a body temperatureabove 36°C when they arrived in the PACU.Even though there was a statistically significant dif-ference in preoperative temperatures in the prewarmedgroup vs the group that was not prewarmed, once inthe operating room no significant differences were seenbetween the 2 groups with the first recorded operatingroom temperature. By the time the patients in eithergroup entered the operating room, body temperaturewas cooled from baseline preoperative temperature read-ings.Preoperative forced-air warming was discontinueden route to the operating room. Although this study didnot account for when the intraoperative warming wasinitiated, clinically, it is common practice to instituteforced-air warming with the Bair Hugger after the patientis surgically draped. Body temperature cools during thiselapsed time.A number of threats to external and internal validityexisted in this study. Two different instruments wereused to obtain temperature readings. The patient's base-line temperature in the preoperative area was obtainedwith an oral thermometer. This temperature was thencompared with temperature readings obtained via anesophageal probe in the operating room. Perhaps usingthe same type of thermometer throughout the studywould produce more valid results. Patient characteris-tics and intraoperative variables such as BMl, age, ASAclass,estimated blood loss, and total intravenous fluidswere controlled for in this study and were found to bestatistically insignificant between the 2 groups. Data alsoindicated that all patients received warmed intravenousfluids intraoperatively. Extraneous variables not con-trolled for included ambient temperatures and staffper-sons taking temperature readings. Environmental tem-peratures can have an effect on core body temperatures.A cool environment can cause the body to lose heat anddecrease core body temperature. This may contribute tothe decrease in body temperature that was noted once thepatient entered the operating room. Also, the operatingroom nurse may or may not have warmed the operatingroom bed mattress, thus affecting patient temperaturereadings in this study. This variable was not taken into
Background image
Image of page 6

You've reached the end of your free preview.

Want to read all 7 pages?

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

Stuck? We have tutors online 24/7 who can help you get unstuck.
A+ icon
Ask Expert Tutors You can ask You can ask You can ask (will expire )
Answers in as fast as 15 minutes