CCSSELA LiteracySL9 105 Make strategic use of digital media eg textual

Ccssela literacysl9 105 make strategic use of digital

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CCSS.ELA-Literacy.SL.9-10.5 Make strategic use of digital media (e.g., textual, graphical, audio, visual, and interactive elements) in presentations to enhance understanding of findings, reasoning, and evidence and to add interest.
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143 J o u r n e y s i n F i l m : H i d d e n F i g u r e s L e s s o n 8 (SCIENCE, HISTORY, CAREER READINESS) Duration of the Lesson Three to five one-hour periods, depending on how much class time is available for student research and extension activities. Assessment Student posters Class discussion Presentations Materials Whiteboard Dry-erase markers Regular markers 8.5" x 11" paper (at least five, to be used for the Position Placards in Part 1) Tape Computers with Internet access (enough for a class working in pairs) Projector Websites provided in the procedures Handout 1: Notable STEM Contributions Handout 2: Self-Assessment--Notable STEM Contributions (Answer Key) Handout 3: Breaking the Stereotype—Poster Project for Visualizing Women in STEM Handout 4: Do Girls See Themselves As Smart? Handout 5: Portraits of Inspiration Handout 6: Your Turn, Girl! Procedure Part 1: STEM Careers: A Historical Perspective 1. Divide the students into groups of two or three. Distribute and review the instructions for Handout 1: Notable STEM Contributions . Remind the students that STEM stands for science, technology, engineering, and mathematics, and that “A” is sometimes added for art as part of a “STEAM” alternative. Allow groups approximately 5–10 minutes to complete the questions. (Do not reveal to students until they are finished that the answers to Set A Questions 1–10, are all women; answers to Set B Questions 11–20, are all men.) 2. When students seem to have finished the handout or run out of answers, distribute Handout 2: Self-Assessment— Notable STEM Contributions (Answer Key) . Ask students to tally their scores for Sets A and B separately. Then tally the total for class scores for each set and quickly calculate both averages for the entire class, noting that the scores for Set A will likely be lower than for Set B. 3. Review and discuss the answers as part of a class discussion, using the questions below to help guide the conversation: a. How do the class’s answers in Set A compare with those in Set B? b. How do your own scores for each set compare with each other? c. How do your individual scores for each set compare with the class averages? d. If the individual or class averages for Set A are lower than for Set B, ask : Why do you think the average for Set A is lower than for Set B?
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e. If the individual or class averages for Set A are the same or higher than for Set B, ask : How do you think the averages between Sets A and B might change if a few hundred students were asked to answer these questions?
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