Remember the heart of a soho network is the soho

Info icon This preview shows pages 55–57. Sign up to view the full content.

Remember, the heart of a SOHO network is the SOHO router, which combines the functionality of several devices. When selecting a SOHO router, make sure to select one that can provide all the functionality required in the SOHO environment, which might include things like an integratedInternet modem, or wireless access point.
Image of page 55

Info icon This preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

A small office/home office (SOHO) is a small network that is typically based in the home or a small business center. Most SOHO networks have the following characteristics: Between 1–10 connected hosts (computers, mobile devices, or printers) Uses Ethernet or 802.11 wireless networking (or both) as the network medium A single Internet connection is shared among all hosts Uses a single subnet Employs a workgroup networking model (i.e., there are no dedicated servers and a domain is not used) A typical SOHO network uses the following devices: A modem or router connects the location to the Internet. This connection provides a single IP address for connecting to the Internet. A router connects the private network to the Internet connection. This router is typically a multifunction device, which includes a four port switch, wireless access point, and firewall functionality. Additional wired connections can be provided by connecting additional switches to the router. A SOHO network uses multiple devices that share a single Internet connection. The connection to the Internet is typically through an access point or router that includes switch ports and/or a wireless access point to connect devices to the local area network and the Internet. The type of device you use depends on the Internet connection type (DSL, cable, fiber, etc.). The following table describes general steps you would take to configure a SOHO router and set up the network: Action Description Configure the Internet connection Begin by connecting the router to the Internet connection using the device's WAN port. For a DSL or ISDN router, connect the device directly to the DSL/ISDN line. For a cable, fiber optic, or satellite connection, connect the router to the Ethernet port on the modem or connection device. Many routers will automatically detect and configure the Internet connection. If not, follow the ISP instructions for setting up the connection. This could include: Configuring the Internet connection with a static IP address assigned by the ISP or configuring the device to use DHCP for addressing Configuring the protocol used for the connection. This will often be PPPoE for an always-on Internet connection Configuring logon information (username and password) to access the Internet Configuring a default gateway and DNS server addresses that the router will use in order to access the Internet Configure the router Before setting up the network, some basic settings on the router need to be configured.
Image of page 56
Image of page 57
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.
  • Spring '14
  • Computer network, Local area network, Network topology, Metropolitan area network

{[ snackBarMessage ]}

What students are saying

  • Left Quote Icon

    As a current student on this bumpy collegiate pathway, I stumbled upon Course Hero, where I can find study resources for nearly all my courses, get online help from tutors 24/7, and even share my old projects, papers, and lecture notes with other students.

    Student Picture

    Kiran Temple University Fox School of Business ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    I cannot even describe how much Course Hero helped me this summer. It’s truly become something I can always rely on and help me. In the end, I was not only able to survive summer classes, but I was able to thrive thanks to Course Hero.

    Student Picture

    Dana University of Pennsylvania ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    The ability to access any university’s resources through Course Hero proved invaluable in my case. I was behind on Tulane coursework and actually used UCLA’s materials to help me move forward and get everything together on time.

    Student Picture

    Jill Tulane University ‘16, Course Hero Intern