Knocking a banana out of goodalls hand with a stick o

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Knocking a banana out of Goodall’s hand with a stick o Using objects for threat display Each example of tool use should include: o A well-explained description of the tool use, including the tools and subject of tool use o The function of the tool, reason for its use Examples should come from AE articles and/or Through a Window , and should be examples of chimpanzee tool use specifically Explanation of how Goodall’s observations of tool use Influenced the definition of human: o Tool use was previously a defining hallmark of humanity o Leakey’s famous statement that now we have to redefine tool, redefine man, or accept chimpanzees as human o Mention of what Goodall’s observations were, if not previously explained
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Anth 200g Midterm 1 Key Fall 2010 o Goodall’s observations forced us to accept that we are not alone in our use of tools, thus forcing our re-evaluation of how we had defined being “human” Question #5: Describe three ways that science differs from faith as a way of understanding the natural world. (Several possible answers; some examples (as discussed in lecture) listed below. 3-4 points for each explanation totaling 10 points): Science is a process/based on observations and experiments: Science is never ‘over.’ The scientific method allows for the generation and testing of hypotheses. Through careful observation and/or experimentation, hypotheses can be supported or refuted. The same process of observation, hypothesizing, and testing might reach a good answer today, but that same process might be used to reach a different (or at least a better) answer tomorrow. While aspects of a person’s faith or belief system can change over time, those changes usually have to do with changes in one’s own personal perspectives and experiences, rather than an explicit experimental or observational process. Science does not set out to “prove” that things are true (only to disprove) - Scientists strive to remain open to the idea that their theories (and even what they believe to be facts) may be wrong. Science is objective : Scientists strive not to let personal beliefs or preconceptions bias one’s thinking or interpretation of events (though of course this is difficult). Faith is by definition a subjective belief system, and is often strongly influenced by one’s background, upbringing, family, etc. Science is falsifiable: In a scientific paradigm, nothing can be ‘proven’ with absolute, 100% certainty; ideas can only be disproven. Faith, by definition, requires a person to accept some concepts as ‘True’ regardless of any evidence for or against them. Science is cumulative: Science builds on the ideas and concepts produced by previous work. Sometimes past work is wrong or misleading (such as interpretations of fossils on mountaintops as evidence for the Biblical flood); other times it provides important tools for
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Anth 200g Midterm 1 Key Fall 2010 advancement and understanding. Darwin’s ideas about evolution drew on observations and ideas that others had been thinking about and writing about for centuries. (None of the above arguments mean that faith is necessarily a wrong way to understand the world, or that science is the only way to understand the world. The bottom line is that faith is a very different paradigm than science.)
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