What did he there Could he be the murderer of my brother Victor Frankenstein

What did he there could he be the murderer of my

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have given life. What did he there? Could he be the murderer of my brother?" - Victor Frankenstein describes how he feels about his creation. Passage 2 "You minutely described…………. I sickened as I read, "Hateful day when I received [email protected]" I exclaimed in agony. "Accused creator. Why did you form a monster so hideous that even YOU turned from me in disgust? God, in pity, mane man beautiful and alluring after his own image; but my form is a filthy type of yours, more horrid even from the very resemblance. Satan had his companions, fellow devils, to admire and encourage him, but I am solitary and abhorred. " This is the Monster speaking to Victor Frankenstein The monster cannot believe he was created alone. He cannot believe he was created only to be hated.
The Romantics: Percy Shelley and Lord Byron The Murders in the Rue Morgue Author: Edgar Allen Poe Born on January 19, 1809 and died at the age of 40; Alcoholic; Born in Boston, died in Baltimore Best known for his short stories; Stories of Mystery and Macabre; Raven Considered the inventor of Detective Fiction with this fiction work; becomes the inspiration for Sherlock Holmes Published: April 18, 1841 Language: English Theme: Justice and judgement Exercises of ingenuity Brains vs. Brawn Ratiocination (Dupin's Method) Inspiration: London's recently created detective unit Main character based off of Eugene Francois Vidocq - A French criminal and criminalist; First private detective Protagonist: Monsieur Dupin Antagonist: Illogic, Lack of rationilization, and the orangutan Conflict: Dupin vs. Unknown, Dupin v Sailor Influenced Works: Modern day detective movies and stories; Murder She Wrote, Sherlock Holmes, Law and Order, etc. Passage 1 "As the strong man exults in his physical ability, delighting in such exercises as call his muscles into action, so glories the analyst in that moral activity which disentangles. He derives pleasure from even the most trivial occupations bringing his talents into play. He is fond of enigmas, of conundrums, of hieroglyphics; exhibiting in his solutions of each a degree of acumen which appears to the ordinary apprehension preternatural. His results, brought about by the very soul and essence of method, have, in truth, the whole air of intuition." The narrator describing Dubin's intelligence. Refers to Dupins intelligence Passage 2 "Of Madame L'Espanaye no traces were here seen; but an unusual quantity of soot being observed in the fire-place, a search was made in the chimney, and (horrible to relate!) THE CORPSE OF THE DAUGHTER, HEAD DOWNWARD, WAS DRAGGED THEREFROM IT HAVING BEEN THUS FORCED UP THE NARROW APERTURE FOR A CONSIDERABLE DISTANCE. The body was quite warm. Upon examining it, many excoriations were perceived, no doubt occasioned by the violence which it had been thrust up and disengaged. Upon the face were many severe scratches, and, upon the throat, dark bruises, and deep indentations of finger nails, as if the deceased had been throttled to death." The newspaper article about the murder read by Dupin Describes the scene of the murder
Passage 3:

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