Typically they dont not in the short term in fact

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Typically, they don’t – not in the short term. In fact, sometimes they can backfire, as in the case of gay rights cases.
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Court Decisions and Public Opinion on Same-Sex Relations Bowers v Hardwick (1986) Lawrence v Texas (2003) Bowers upholds laws making gay sex a crime; public opinion gradually becomes opposed to those laws. Lawrence strikes down laws making gay sex a crime; public opinion immediately shifts in favor of these laws for a year or so.
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Egan, Persily, Wallsten: Courts and Backlash Can court decisions change public opinion? Typically, they don’t – not in the short term. In fact, they can backfire, as in the case of recent gay rights cases. Why the backlash? In the wake of the Lawrence decision… …Republican elites derided it, while …Democratic elites said very little at all. Public opinion took awhile to recover. The moral of the story: the Court’s power to change opinion is limited by how elites respond to its decisions.
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Whittington: “Interpose Your Friendly Hand” Courts really only have power to the extent that the other actors in the system allow it to do so. So why would Congress and the President let this happen? When they face obstructions in advancing their policy agendas, they look to an allied Court for help. Because judicial review upsets the status quo, this is more likely to be the tactic of those who want to change the status quo than preserve it.
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Whittington: “Interpose Your Friendly Hand” Whittington presents three examples of instances under which this has taken place: 1. Overcoming federalism : when Congress faces resistance from the states, it may look to the Court to overturn state law and bring them into line with a dominant national philosophy. E.g. striking down state laws in the Federalist Era 2. Overcoming entrenched interests : the Court may help a determined majority oust a strong minority E.g. Baker v. Carr (1962) 3. Overcoming fractious coalitions : bargainers who agree to a logroll may welcome intervention by the Court E.g. Wealthy industrialists want tariff reduction legislation; they agree to a national income tax for it to pass in Congress. They welcome the tax’s invalidation by Court (1894). National income tax becomes constitutional under 16 th Amendment (1913)
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Social Policy in the United States By social policy , scholars generally mean the set of government programs known as the “welfare state.” Redistribute income Welfare, EITC, Social Security (retirement benefits), Food Stamps Insure risk Medicaid/Medicare, Social Security (disability benefits), unemployment benefits, workers’ compensation Other policies arguably fall under the umbrella of social policy, as well: Student loans, child tax credits, public housing
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Social Policy in the United States It will come as no surprise to you that by just about any measure, the American welfare state is smaller than those of most other industrialized nations.
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