Sammy wanted the girls to hear him but they just kept on going through the

Sammy wanted the girls to hear him but they just kept

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on going through the parking lot. He was not about to stop now, he states "you didn't have to embarrass them" (Updike). At this point, stated by Magill, "Sammy, like many other characters of Updike's stories, puts himself in a position in which he can hurt or disgrace his family. He is left to make a decision whether to quit or not, after the girls leave. Lengel is a family friend, and reminds Sammy that his
Fowler 4parents would not be happy if he were to quit. At this time, Sammy also realizes that if he backs down hewill never be able to stand up for his beliefs later in life" (Magill). Here Sammy goes on with his decision of "quitting" knowing that he had to make a choice and take a stand for what he believed was the right thing to do. Sammy knows his parents will be upset with him, but he realizes he is growing up and needs to take responsibility for himself and his life ahead of him. Throughout the story you can see the growth of Sammy. He starts off being immature, gazing at the girls as they stroll around the store. But, as the story goes on he begins to grow up and realizes that he does not have to be like everyone else and begins to make his own decisions. He starts by feeling sympathetic for the girls and not just looking at their appearance. Then to stand up to his boss and telling him he doesn't like the way he treated the girls. Sammy goes on to quit his job and take a stand for what he believes is right, not what others think is right for him. This shows his growth to mature and make his own rational decisions no matter what consequences may arise. Works Cited
Fowler 5Magill, Frank N. Critical Survey of Short Fiction. Vol. 6. Pasadena, California: Salem Press, 1993.Print.Updike, John. “A&P.” The Norton Introduction to Literature. Kelly J Mays. 11thed. New York: W.W. Norton and Company, 2000. 864-869. Print.Wells, Walter. “John Updike’s ‘A&P’: a return visit to Araby.” Studies in Short Fiction 30.2 (1993): 127. Literary Reference Center. Web. 22 January. 2015.

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