Doyles transition from hummingbirds to blue whales came rather surprisingly but

Doyles transition from hummingbirds to blue whales

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Doyle’s transition from hummingbirds to blue whales came rather surprisingly but creates a big contrast; one of the smallest hearts in the world to the biggest heart in the world. By doing so, he is allowing the reader to compare the two animals and point out their differences. He mainly describes the characteristics of the whale’s heart but sums up the paragraph with this statement. “The animals with the largest hearts in the world generally travel in pairs, and their penetrating moaning cries, can be heard underwater for miles and miles.” This last statement is exceptionally powerful and it relates back to the underlying idea of this essay as it ties well with the last paragraph. The comparison he makes between the lifetime of a tortoise and hummingbird has somewhat of a deep meaning. It illustrates that we too, have the choice to spend our heartbeats
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the way we desire; either slow like a tortoise or fast like a hummingbird. We are able to make our own decisions that ultimately decide our outcome or fate. Despite discussing the differences between the hummingbird and the whale or the number of chambers a certain living being has in their heart, Doyle lays out this incredibly meaningful sentence. “We all churn inside.” This is pointing out that everything that all living things go through is experienced by the heart; through its ups and down, through all the pain and suffering.
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