As far back as 1970 Moss and Staunton demonstrated that drawing blood through a

As far back as 1970 moss and staunton demonstrated

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“As far back as 1970, Moss and Staunton demonstrated that drawing blood through a 25-gauge catheter did not cause hemolysis. They reported that hemolysis was caused by using a high pressure delivery system, not by the gauge of the intravenous catheter” (Makic, 2013). There are three things nurses should consider: 1. Nursing assessment should guide the choice of intravenous catheter size in non-urgent packed red blood cell transfusions. 2. To achieve the desired clinical effects of a packed red blood cell infusion, infusion of blood products without the application of pressure is necessary, rather than insertion of the largest intravenous catheter possible. 3. Using a smaller-gauge intravenous catheter to transfuse packed red blood cells increases patients’ comfort and satisfaction, and by potentially avoiding the need for
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insertion of a central catheter, eliminates some costs and thus reduces costs overall (Makic, 2013). Evaluating healthcare practice continually and adopting evidence based practice interventions as research evolves and new evidence becomes available should be the norm in healthcare practice. Some traditional practices of critical care nurses should be replaced with evidence-based practices. Critical care nurses provide an essential contribution to the translation of best evidence into practice by continually moving nursing practice forward in the care of the most vulnerable patients (Makic, 2013). References: The Impact of Evidence-Based Practice in Nursing and the Next Big Ideas. (n.d.). Retrieved July 26, 2016, from TableofContents/Vol-18-2013/No2-May-2013/Impact-of-Evidence-Based-Practice.html Response: Evidence to support the importance of hand hygiene in preventing infection dates back to the 1800’s. The World Health Organization published guidelines for hand hygiene in health care to increase patient safety by ensuring clean care. The guidelines state that for transmission of organisms from health care workers to patients, the following sequence of events must occur: 1. The organisms must be present on the patient’s skin or inanimate objects and transfer to the health care worker’s hands 2. The organism must survive for several minutes on the hands of the health care worker 3. Hand washing or hand antisepsis by the health care worker is inadequate or omitted 4. The contaminated hands of the health care worker come in direct contact with another patient or inanimate object that will be in direct contact with the patient.
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  • Summer '16
  • michael jones
  • Nursing, Health care provider, health care worker

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