Post Extrication Care 1 If still unresponsive assess breathing and pulse for up

Post extrication care 1 if still unresponsive assess

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Post Extrication Care 1. If still unresponsive, assess breathing and pulse for up to 10 seconds. 2. If the guest has a pulse but is not showing signs of normal breathing, begin rescue breathing using a resuscitation mask or BVM attached to supplemental oxygen. 3. If the pulse is absent begin CPR and apply an AED as soon as it is available. 4. If an AED calls for a shock, deliver it immediately and resume CPR.
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36 Guest struck head, neck, or back. Guest is supporting head/neck/back. Guest complains of discomfort in head/neck/back. Observe serious head/neck/back wounds or deformity. Numbness, tingling, burning sensations. Limited ability to move. Signs of possible spinal injury include: Suspecting Spinal Injury
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37 1. Use an Ease In entry if the guest is nearby. 2. Use a Spinal Motion Restriction (SMR) technique. 3. Communicate with the guest throughout the process. 4. Assess responsiveness and breathing. 5. Secure the guest to a backboard and safely remove from the water. There are 5 general care steps for suspected spinal injury in the water. Caring for Spinal Injury: Spinal Motion Restriction (SMR)
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38 1. Approach the guest and release the rescue tube. Grasp the guest’s upper arms. 2. Position the guest on his back, extending the arms overhead. Squeeze the arms against the head to hold the head still. The Underarm Vise Grip is a SMR technique used for a guest in the water. For a guest found face-up in shallow water: Activate your EAP. Enter the water safely. 3. Confirm responsiveness and breathing. SMR: Guests Face-Up in Shallow Water
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39 1. Approach the guest and release the rescue tube. 2. Grasp the guest’s upper arms. Extend the arms overhead and squeeze the arms against the ears to hold the head still. 3. Walk forward and slowly roll the guest face up into the underarm vise grip position. 4. Confirm responsiveness and breathing. The Underarm Vise Grip is a SMR technique used for a guest in the water. For a guest found face-down in shallow water: Activate your EAP. Enter the water safely. SMR: Guests Face-Down in Shallow Water
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