is breathtaking in scope transform a developing country of more than 1 billion

Is breathtaking in scope transform a developing

This preview shows page 321 - 323 out of 323 pages.

is breathtaking in scope: transform a developing country of more than 1 billion people into a developed nation and global leader by 2020, and do this as a democracy in an era of resource scarcity and environmental degradation. The world has to cheer India on. If India fails, there is a real risk that our world will become hostage to political chaos, war over dwindling resources, a poisoned environment, and galloping disease.Wealthy enclaves will employ private companies to supply their needs and private militias to protect them from the poor massing at their gates. But, if India succeeds, it will demonstrate that it is possible to lift hundreds of millions of people out of poverty.It will prove that multiethnic, multireligious democracy is not a luxury for rich societies.It will show us how to save our environment, and how to manage in a fractious, multipolar world. India’s gambit is truly the venture of the century.
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2AC Hydroxyl Excess fossil fuel pollution and so2 kills-off hydroxyl – that’s necessary forplanetary survivalPearce et al ‘7(Fred, and Paul Crutzen, Max Planck Institute for Chemistry, Mainz, Germany. An atmospheric chemist who won the Nobel Prize in 1995 for his work predicting the destruction of the ozone layer, Crutzen pioneered thinking about stratospheric chemistry, the role of man-made aerosols inshading the planet, and "nuclear winter," and coined the term "Anthropocene." John Mercer, formerly of Ohio State University, Columbus., Mercer also pioneered research on tropical glaciers.Drew Shindell, NASA's Goddard Institute for Space Studies, New York. An ozone-layer expert and climate modeler, Shindell is doing groundbreaking research on unexpected links between the upper and the lower atmosphere, revealing how the stratosphere can amplify small changes in surface temperature, “With speed and violence: why scientists fear tipping points in climate change,” pg online @ //um-ef)It could be the doomsday that creeps up on us unawares: the day the atmosphere's cleaning service fails to show up for work. For one of the most disturbing secrets of our planet's metabolism is that just one chemical is responsible for cleaning most of the pollution out of the atmosphere.If it took a day off, we would be in serious trouble, with smog spreading unchecked across the planet.The chemicalin question is called hydroxyl. Its molecules are made up of one atom of oxygen and one atom of hydrogen. They are created when ultraviolet radiation bombards common gases such as ozone and water vapor. But it is the most ephemeral of chemicals. Almost as soon as it is created,it reacts with some other molecule, mostly some polluting substance, and is gone again. It has an average lifetime of about a second. Because it comes and goes so fast, it is also rather rare, with an average concentration in the atmosphere of less than one part per trillion. You could pack every last molecule of the stuff into the Great Pyramid of
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