Production and management enugu ryce kerex publishers

This preview shows page 13 - 16 out of 83 pages.

Production and Management. Enugu: Ryce-Kerex publishers Baran, S.I (2002). Introduction to Mass communication, Media Literacy and Culture Boston: McGraw Hill Inc. Mcleish, R.C.(1985). Radio Production. New York: McGraw Hill Inc. Nworgu, K.O. (2010)” Introduction to Mass Communication” in K.O. Nworgu(ed.) Mass Communication , Theory and practice Owerri: Ultimate book Ltd.
14 Unit 3 Attributes of the Broadcast Media Technology Contents 1.0 Introduction 2.0 Objectives 3.0 Main content 3.1 Attributes of the broadcast media technology 3.1.1 Fascimile technology 3.1.2 Transduction 3.1.3 Signal and noise 3.1.4 Analogue and digital signals 3.1.5 Oscillation and wave form 3.1.6 Frequency and amplitude 3.1.7 Frequency and response 4.0 Conclusion 5.0 Summary 6.0 Exercise 6.1 Self-Assessed Exercise 6.2 Tutor-Marked Assignment 7.0 References/Further Reading 1.0 Introduction The broadcast media differ from other media of communication due to the transmission technology these media use in disseminating signals and in converting such signals received by the audience. This unit is aimed at looking at these technological principles that make broadcasting possible. 2.0 Objectives At the end of this unit, students would have known the principles that make broadcasting possible. Such principles are facsimile technology, transduction signal and noise, and analogue and digital signals. Others are oscillation and wave form, frequency and amplitude and frequency response. 3.0 Main Content 3.1 Attributes of the broadcast Media Technology. Broadcasting is made possible due to certain technological attributes or principles. Without these principles, broadcasting would not have been possible. It sounds and looks simple when broadcasting is defined as the use of electromagnetic waves in disseminating messages to a large heterogeneous audience. The process and principles involved are complex, sophisticated and highly technical. The attributes or principles as enumerated by Dominick, Messere and Sherma (2004) are as follows
15 3.1.1 Fascimile Technology This refers to the basic mode of all mass communication generated messages. The principle of facsimile technology refers to the attempt to replicate original sounds and voices, pictures and visuals. This is because sounds you hear in radio or pictures on television screen are not the original forms but are merely representations or fascimiles of their original forms. Your photographs are fascimiles as well as photocopied documents. They are not originals. Broadcast messages are not originals but are facsimiles of original voices or pictures of the speakers or images. In general, the more faithful the reproduction or fascimile is to the original, the greater its fidelity. The engineer’s goal in the broadcast industry is to create the best possible fascimile of the original sound or image and to disseminate them without losing too much fidelity known as signal loss. 3.1.2 Transduction The principle of transduction refers to the process of changing one form of energy into another (Owuamalam, 2006, Agbanu and Nwammuo, 2009). All Television,

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture