Glencoe Health 2005.pdf

Children often imitate the behavior of adults what

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Children often imitate the behavior of adults. What are some examples of positive behaviors adults can display when they are around children?
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505 Lesson 4 Infancy and Childhood S TAGES OF I NFANCY AND C HILDHOOD Each stage of development is associated with a developmental task that involves a person’s relationship with other people. Stage 1 Infancy: Birth to 1 year Task: To develop trust Description: Infant is completely dependent on others to meet his or her needs. Must be able to trust others to provide for needs. Stage 2 Early Childhood: 1 to 3 years Task: To develop ability to do tasks for oneself Description: Child learns to walk, talk, and dress and feed himself or herself. Self-control and confidence begin to develop, and child begins desiring independence. Stage 3 Middle Childhood: 4 to 6 years Task: To develop respon- sibility, take initiative, to create one’s own play Description: Child becomes more engaged in interactions with others. Models adult behavior by helping with household chores. Learns to control impulses. Stage 4 Late Childhood: 7 to 12 years Task: To develop an interest in performing activities Description: Child completes transition from home to school; learns to make things, use tools, and acquire skills. increase by 50 percent. Infancy is a time of learning—how to eat solid food and how to sit, crawl, and walk. An important task for an infant is developing trust. Infants of parents who are attentive— who play with and talk to the infant and give comfort—learn to view the world as a safe place. These children see people as being dependable. If parents ignore a child’s needs, the child may learn to be distrustful. Early Childhood Children in early childhood begin to feel proud of their accom- plishments, and they become eager to learn more. During this time children develop many new skills. They learn to talk, climb, push, and pull. They increase their vocabulary and begin talking in sen- tences. If parents accept the child’s need to do whatever he or she is capable of, the child will develop a sense of the con- fidence that a person can control his or her own body, impulses, and envi- ronment. If parents are overprotective or critical of the child’s behaviors, the child may develop doubts about his or her abilities. autonomy
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What Would You Do? How can Colleen find out more about age-appropriate toys? Apply the six steps of the decision-making process to Colleen’s situation. 1. State the situation. 2. List the options. 3. Weigh the possible outcomes. 4. Consider values. 5. Make a decision and act. 6. Evaluate the decision. 506 Chapter 19 Prenatal Development and Birth Middle Childhood During middle childhood children learn to initiate play activities rather than merely following the lead of others. Children of this age display their intelligence by asking many questions. They must learn to recognize emotions and practice expressing them in appro- priate ways. If parents show approval of these new abilities and encourage questions, children learn creativity, initiative, and the ability to start something on their own. Children of parents who
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