Were undertaken in 2009 as part of a dewha funded

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were undertaken in 2009 as part of a DEWHA-funded threatened flora project, targeting King Island’s Yellow Rock land system; the surveys included areas on the following 1:25000 mapsheets: Wickham, New Year, Egg Lagoon, Reekara, Loorana, Currie, Pearshape and Stokes (Figure 6). New subpopulations were limited to the species’ previously known range between Cape Wickham and the Yellow Rock River (Threatened Species Section 2009). Distribution and Habitat On mainland Australia Pterostylis cucullata subsp. cucullata occurs in southern Victoria where it is considered to be extremely rare, and in South Australia where it is thought to be extinct (Jones 2006; EPBC Act website, January 2009). In Tasmania Pterostylis cucullata subsp. cucullata is known from near-coastal areas in the northwest, including King Island, Hunter Island and Three Hummock Island, with an outlying occurrence on Flinders Island. There are also nineteenth century records from the north coast at Circular Head and George Town, though these sites are now presumed to be extinct. On King Island Pterostylis cucullata subsp. cucullata grows on near-coastal calcareous dunes and sand-sheets associated with the 16,800 ha Yellow Rock land system (Figure 6; Richley 1984), generally within or close to the margins of mature closed scrub dominated by Leptospermum laevigatum (coast teatree). Associated species include Leucopogon parviflorus (coast beardheath), Poa spp. (tussock grasses) and herbs such as Dichondra repens (kidney weed). Sites are typically sheltered, with seasonally damp but well-drained humus-rich sandy loams, often with moss and deep leaf litter. Flowering plants typically comprise about 10% of any given colony, with fewer flowers in more exposed situations. In Tasmania the species grows within an altitude range of 10 to 30 m above sea level. It has a linear range of 350 km, an extent of occurrence of 31,400 km 2 (which includes large areas of sea), and an area of occupancy of perhaps 80 ha. Populations Pterostylis cucullata is known from at least 16 extant subpopulations in Tasmania, with a total of around 10,000 to 11,000 plants. All known subpopulations , and any new subpopulations found, are considered important for the survival of the species in Tasmania. The 5 subpopulations delineated on King Island appear to be the most extensive in Tasmania (Table 6), with an absolute count of over 6,500 individuals in 2008– 2009 (Branson 2008b; TSS surveys in 2009). These appear to represent the vestiges of a meta-population stretching from Cape Wickham in the north to Yellow Rock River in the south (with much of the area still to be surveyed). King Island Biodiversity Management Plan 139
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Habitat critical to the survival of the species Habitat critical to the survival of Pterostylis cucullata on King Island includes all known sites, as well as potential habitat, the latter represented by stands of coast teatree scrub within the Yellow Rock land system between Cape Wickham and the Yellow Rock River.
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  • Fall '14
  • The Hours, ........., Threatened species, Bass Strait, Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999, King Island

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