These numbers are in season Comparing this to fifteen hours in class a week and

These numbers are in season comparing this to fifteen

This preview shows page 8 - 11 out of 15 pages.

workouts. These numbers are in season. Comparing this to fifteen hours in class a week and a mere six hours in study hall. A college student spends about fifteen hours studying and six hours in class, daily. This is a problem. These statistics have been proven to affect the academic performance of student-athletes. Off-season, athletes have to be present on campus, involved in workouts and practices, even when the season is not in session.
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Image and likeness is also another way that the NCAA exploits college athletes. Athletic jerseys are sold in college bookstores and athletes do not receive any type of benefit from this. “So whether you’re UCLA, Ohio State, Duke, North Carolina, Kentucky, or whether you’re a smaller school … everyone is getting paid. It’s the coaches, the athletic directors, the trainers, doctors — everyone on campus is getting paid off of that money that the athlete is bringing in. Except the athletes themselves” says Ed O’Bannon, a former UCLA star that led his team to the 1995 national championship. O’Bannon sued the NCAA for using his likeness and image in July 2009. He filed a lawsuit against the NCAA and the Collegiate Licensing Company, alleging violations of the Sherman Antitrust Act and of actions that deprived him of his right of publicity. He agreed to be the lead plaintiff after seeing his likeness from the 1995 championship team used in a video game without his permission. The game featured a UCLA player who played O'Bannon's power forward position, while also matching his height, weight, bald head, skin tone, No. 31 jersey, and left-handed shot. In January 2011, Oscar Robertson joined O'Bannon in the class action suit. Bill Russell is also among the 20 former college athletes who are plaintiffs. Electronic Arts and the Collegiate Licensing Company (CLC), both original co-defendants with the NCAA, departed from the case and finalized a $40 million settlement that could net as much as $4,000 to as many as 100,000 current and former athletes who had appeared in EA Sports basketball and football video games since 2003. The trial against the NCAA lasted from June 9 to June 27, 2014. The final written closing statements were submitted on July 10. On August 8, 2014, Wilken ruled that the NCAA's long-held practice of excepting payments to athletes violated antitrust laws. She ordered that schools should be allowed to offer full cost-of- attendance scholarships to athletes, covering cost-of-living expenses that were not currently
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part of NCAA scholarships. Wilken also ruled that college be permitted to place as much as $5,000 into a trust for each athlete per year of eligibility. The NCAA subsequently appealed the ruling, arguing that Wilken did not properly consider NCAA v. Board of Regents of the University of Oklahoma. In that case, the NCAA was denied control of college football television rights, but the court also stated: "To preserve the character and quality of the ‘product,’ athletes must not be paid." This case was very prevalent in shedding light on the issue of the NCAA exploiting athletes. Johnny Manziel, former Heisman Trophy-winning quarterback of Texas A&M, was
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