Stacking involves using a systematic way of members

Info icon This preview shows pages 6–9. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
way of directing traffic by use of the stacking method. Stacking involves using a systematic way of members of airing their views on the topic. For example, the leader might assign numbers to members giving each a turn to speak or one to raise their hand. Moreover, leaders need to broaden the participation of members in the group. Kaner (2014) echoes the importance of encouraging members to participate as it provides an “extra bit of permission”. The leader needs
Image of page 6

Info icon This preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
DECISION MAKING 7 to balance the discussion ground because some members are known to hold back ideas for fear of sparking arguments. In other cases, a leader decides to select members who are like-minded thus the thinking automatically becomes convergent. Coming up with the best decision can be a vigorous process to any decision-making group. There are major decision rules involved in every group such as unanimous agreement, majority vote, “flip a coin” and “person in charge decides” (Kaner, 2014). The unanimous agreement involves members understanding others’ perspective until it becomes part and parcel of the agreement. Majority vote offers a win or lose situation among its members thus participants must accept the decision made. Therefore, decision-makers practice the utilitarian framework where it provides “the greatest good for the greatest number (Robbins & Judge, 2012). “Flip a coin” is described as a random way of making decisions such as using a lottery system. “Person-in-charge” occurs when a leader decides without seeking advice on the matter. In most scenarios, the leader asks for the solutions and makes a decision based on them or might choose another alternative that was not recommended. Such leaders depend on randomness error which tends to make them believe their decisions will have the best outcome (Robbins & Judge, 2012). In conclusion, decision making is a procedure which entails various steps to be followed. Any business is dependent on the daily decisions made by the management thus it is very vital to invest in proper decision-making skills. Decisions can be made by either an individual or a group depending on the difficulty of the situation. The models used in solving problems are different when it comes to individuals and groups. The information concerning the problem also contributes to making the correct decision. For instance, if little information is available,
Image of page 7
DECISION MAKING 8 members will seek to use the “flip a coin” method to make a decision, and in most cases, the result doesn’t appease everyone. In other cases, too much information is available hence giving the decision makers a difficult time getting to implement the solution. Understanding the different perspectives of decision making enables people to become efficient and effective in any situation. References
Image of page 8

Info icon This preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
DECISION MAKING 9 Kallet, M. (2014). Think Smarter: Critical thinking to improve problem-solving and decision- making skills . John Wiley & Sons. Kaner, S. (2014). Facilitator's guide to participatory decision-making . John Wiley & Sons. Robbins, S. P., & Judge, T. (2012). Essentials of Organizational Behavior.
Image of page 9
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

{[ snackBarMessage ]}

What students are saying

  • Left Quote Icon

    As a current student on this bumpy collegiate pathway, I stumbled upon Course Hero, where I can find study resources for nearly all my courses, get online help from tutors 24/7, and even share my old projects, papers, and lecture notes with other students.

    Student Picture

    Kiran Temple University Fox School of Business ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    I cannot even describe how much Course Hero helped me this summer. It’s truly become something I can always rely on and help me. In the end, I was not only able to survive summer classes, but I was able to thrive thanks to Course Hero.

    Student Picture

    Dana University of Pennsylvania ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    The ability to access any university’s resources through Course Hero proved invaluable in my case. I was behind on Tulane coursework and actually used UCLA’s materials to help me move forward and get everything together on time.

    Student Picture

    Jill Tulane University ‘16, Course Hero Intern