Edoxaban is a new anticoagulant drug The National Institute for Health and Care

Edoxaban is a new anticoagulant drug the national

This preview shows page 14 - 17 out of 18 pages.

Edoxaban is a new anticoagulant drug. The National Institute for Health and Care Excellence is due to publish guidance so that it can be used in the UK from August 2015. Which anticoagulant medicine should I take? The most commonly prescribed anticoagulant is warfarin, but it does require careful monitoring. The advantage of other anticoagulants (dabigatran, rivaroxaban and apixaban) is that their effect on your blood is more stable and they are not affected by any foods that you eat, so they do not need to be monitored as carefully. Your doctor should talk to you about all the available options, along with their risks and benefits. You should then decide together which anticoagulant would be the most suitable for you. If you have AF, the NHS has produced Stroke Association F11LP Published July 2015 Call our Stroke Helpline on 0303 3033 100 or visit stroke.org.uk 14
Image of page 14
an online tool to help you think about which is the best option for you. You can find this decision aid at: sdm.rightcare.nhs. co.uk/pda/stroke-prevention-for-atrialfibrillation What else do I need to know? We’ve not listed all of the possible side effects and drug interactions in this factsheet. Always read the patient information leaflet that comes with your medication, as this will have a full list. Tell your doctor about any new medication you are taking. Your pharmacist may also be able to give you advice about your medication. Never stop taking your medication if you feel unwell. Always contact your GP for advice – stopping medication suddenly can be dangerous. In a medical emergency, always call 999. If you are taking an anticoagulant, you must always check any new medication you plan to take with your GP or pharmacist before taking it. You should also read the patient information leaflet that comes with your medication. You should be given a patient alert card before you start taking an anticoagulant. Always carry your alert card with you in case of an emergency. You should also tell your dentist you are taking anticoagulant medication before you have any treatment. Stroke Association F11LP Published July 2015 Call our Stroke Helpline on 0303 3033 100 or visit stroke.org.uk 15
Image of page 15
Where can I get help and support? Talk to us Our Stroke Helpline can give you information about stroke and tell you about services and support available in your local area. Call us on 0303 3033 100 (Monday to Friday, 9am–5pm) or email [email protected] Get online We have lots of information about stroke and how to prevent it on our website. Go to stroke.org.uk Other useful contacts If you’re looking for more information the following organisations may also be able to help. All are UK wide unless otherwise stated. Please note that details of these organisations are for information only. We are not recommending or endorsing anyone by including them in this factsheet.
Image of page 16
Image of page 17

You've reached the end of your free preview.

Want to read all 18 pages?

  • Summer '07
  • HARRIS-WARRICK,R.M.
  • The Stroke Association, Stroke Association F11LP, Association F11LP Published

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture