It is a convention of the victorian novel that

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It is a convention of the Victorian novel that, whatever trials and tribulations the hero of heroine must endure through the course of the story, their virtue and determination is always rewarded with wealth and social position at the end. Whilst there are examples in these novels of minor characters living good and contented lives in relative poverty, this is never an option for the main characters. Somehow (usually a secret legacy), they are found to be the rightful possessors of a goodly fortune: it is as though Victorian writers could not conceive of the rewards of virtue in anything other than monetary terms. Chapter 22: Gateshead after Mrs. Reed’s Death 88. In their different ways, Georgiana and Eliza opt for lives which will be sterile and unproductive. In very obvious ways, they waste the potential which God gave them. Explain. Chapter 23: A Proposal and an Acceptance 89. In this novel, the weather closely reflects the drama being played out and the inner feelings of the character. (John Ruskin originated the term ‘pathetic fallacy ’ to describe art which attributes human emotion and conduct to aspects of nature. Ruskin obviously used this term critically, but writers of the Romantic movement constantly made this connection.) Think back to “[t]he rain [which] beat strongly against the panes, the wind [which] blew tempestuously” as Mrs. Reed was dying struggling with her guilt over Jane. In the previous chapter, Jane wrote, “[Mr. Rochester] smile at me … it was the real s unshine of feeling - he shed it over me now.” Comment on the part played by the descriptions of the weather in this chapter, not forgetting the sudden thunder storm at the end. (The fate of the chestnut tree under which Rochester and Jane had been sitting that evening is particularly significant.) 90. This chapter makes significant use of dramatic irony . For example, when Mr. Rochester asks Jane to be his wife, she replies, “‘Your bride stands between us.’” Obviously, she is referring to Blanche, but the plot of the novel will show that what she says is more true than she (or the reader) can know at this point. Any ideas? An example of irony is Jane’s statement, “‘There is no one to meddle, sir, I have no kindred to interfere.’” Jane is so used to thinking o f herself as a solitary orphan. What has she forgotten? There is also the irony that Rochester may have relatives to meddle.
Jane Eyre by Charlotte Brontë © R.A. Moore 2013, 2014 Page 18 91. To the modern reader, Rochester appears domineering, patronizing, manipulative, etc. In fact, as submissive as she is to his position as her master, he actually goads her into an assertion that she is his equal as a person if not socially and that she accepts him of her own free will. Where does Jane achieve this new degree of self-knowledge? 92. There is no doubt that Rochester cruelly deceives Jane by his proposal. What does the author imply when she has him say, “‘I know my Maker sanctions what I do. For the world’s judgement - I wash my hands thereof. For man’s opinion - I defy it’”? (Note that it is these words which bring on the storm. Compare them with Romeo’s agonized outburst, “Then I defy you

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