They always get sick when they eat apples when they

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They always get sick when they eat apples. When they eat apples, they always get sick.
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Grammar Summary Get Page 188 The verb get has many meanings. It can mean to buy, to arrive, to receive, to collect, to become , etc... It is also used to talk about possessions and family relationships. The verb get draws its full meaning from the word or words that immediately follow it. I get the flu every spring. He gets sick . She gets up at 7 a.m. Negative Questions Negative questions can be used to make suggestions. Why don’t you (see) … ? Why don’t they (see) …? Why doesn’t she (see) …? Why doesn’t he (see) …? The Imperative The imperative form of the verb can be used to make suggestions and give advice. Rest in bed. Don’t eat fatty foods. The subject of an imperative statement is always you – singular or plural – but we don’t write you in an imperative statement. You Rest in bed. You shouldn’t mix alcohol and prescription drugs. Don’t mix alcohol and prescription drugs. He shouldn’t mix alcohol and prescription drugs. NO CHANGE
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Grammar Summary Page 189 Have/Have got English speakers often use have and have got interchangeably when talking about possessions, medical conditions, and personal relationships, etc. HAVE = HAVE GOT I have a toothache. I have got a toothache. HAS = HAS GOT He has a toothache. He has got a toothache. Frequency Adverbs Always 100% Usually 80-75% Often 70-60% Sometimes 60-50% Never 0% Present Continuous We make invitations and talk about future plans or intentions (made before speaking) with the present continuous. Are you doing anything Friday night, honey? It’s performing at the Centennial Hall.
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Grammar Summary Page 190 Be going to + Verb We use (be) going to when discussing future intentions or plans that we have already made before speaking. Say, I’m going to be downtown on Thursday afternoon. I’m going to give a presentation around four-thirty. You’re going to have to wait and see. Past Continuous We use the past continuous to say that an action was in progress at a specific time in the past when something else happened (in the past). I was washing the dishes (action in progress) when the phone rang (something else happened). It is also used to describe an action in progress at a specific time in the past. It emphasizes the long duration of the action. I was studiying at this time last year.
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