Gingiva Area of Mandibular Labial Frenum Ventral Tongue Dorsal Tongue Area of

Gingiva area of mandibular labial frenum ventral

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Gingiva Area of Mandibular Labial Frenum Ventral Tongue Dorsal Tongue Area of Labial Maxillary Frenum Mandibular Buccal Frenum Area of Lingual Mandibular Frenum Oral Mucosa Lip FIGURE 6—The Frena and Tongue Surfaces
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Dental Terminology and Anatomy 11 The Maxillary Labial Frenum The maxillary labial frenum is located between the two front teeth, known as the central incisors. The beginning of the frenum starts at the gingiva (gum tissue), passes through the oral mucosa, and ends on the lingual (tongue-side) surface of the lip. The frenum gains significance only if it’s attached too closely to the central incisors. In such a situation, it can cause a space between these two teeth, known as a diastema. The space can be closed through orthodontic work, using braces. However, before this can be accomplished, the frenum must be removed from this area. The frenum may cause the space to reopen if it’s not treated correctly. The Mandibular Labial Frenum The mandibular labial frenum is located in the lower dental arch, between the two lower central incisors. This frenum also begins its attachment in the gingiva and passes through the oral mucosa in order to insert itself into the inner surface of the lower lip. Like the maxillary labial frenum, it can cause a space between the two lower central incisors. Surgical removal is often required in such a situation. However, this procedure is performed less frequently than the maxillary labial frenum procedure. The Mandibular Lingual Frenum The mandibular lingual frenum is located underneath the tongue. It originates in the floor of the mouth and passes to the under surface of the mucosa. In some children, the lingual frenum is short and tight after birth, partially restricting movement of the tongue. This con- dition is called ankyloglossitis —more commonly known as tongue-tie. Generally, the frenum draws away naturally dur- ing the first year after birth, and the tongue-tie resolves on its own. Rarely, a child may need to seek treatment if a tight frenum is interfering with eating and/or speech. Treatment includes “releasing” the tongue by a very simple surgery called a frenulectomy. Frena is the plural of frenum. Frenulum is an alternate spelling of frenum. Frenula is the plural of frenulum.
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Dental Terminology and Anatomy 12 It’s normal for toddlers under the age of three to have diffi- culty with words containing “th” and “r.” An evaluation by an experienced speech pathologist is usually suggested before a surgical frenum release. Many insurance companies won’t cover the surgery unless it’s medically proven to seriously hinder either feeding or speech or both. The Buccal Frenum The buccal frenum can be found on both the maxillary and mandibular arches, in the area of the first premolars, passing from the gingiva to the inner surface of the cheek. It’s very rare that the buccal frenum causes any oral problems or abnormalities.
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