ArkNavReport_TOC_Acronyms_ExecSummary.doc

Component 3 200000 cfs component fm 200 there would

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Component 3: 200,000 cfs Component (FM-200). There would be annual net benefits approximating $7.5 million under this component compared to No Action. Positive economic benefits would be associated with navigation and Table E-2. Calculating an Increase in Annual Average Tow Size Tow size Increase by JanTran and PBSG (tows) 3 Percent of MKARNS Tows x 58% MKARNS Tow size Increase During Efficient Flow 1.74 Percentage of Year with Efficient Flow x 81% Increase in Yearly Average Tow size for MKARNS 1.42 Current Yearly Average Tow size for MKARNS + 6.9 New Yearly Average Tow size for MKARNS 8.32 xv
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hydropower. Negative economic impacts would be associated with real estate, tourism and recreation, non- agricultural and agricultural properties as a result of flooding from the higher release. Annual navigation benefits would approximate $9.2 million under this component, with the remaining annual benefits associated with hydropower ($1 million). Tourism and recreation costs ($0.8 million) comprise about 30% of the negative impacts under this component. Annual average real estate costs would approximate an additional $1.0 million compared to the No Action, while non-agricultural and agricultural property damages would approximate $1 million. Component 4: Operations Only Component (FM-OPS). There would be annual net benefits approximating $8.8 million with the implementation of this component compared to No Action, and over $0.9 million greater annual net benefits than the 175,000 cfs component. Thus, Component 4 represents the flow management component that would provide the greatest annual net benefits. This is mainly because increased flows above 150,000 cfs would benefit navigation but at significant expense from increased flooding along the river basin. Similar to 175,000 cfs and 200,000 cfs components, much of the net benefits would be associated with navigation and hydropower. Annual navigation benefits would approximate $8.4 million, comprising 95% of the benefits under this component. The remaining benefits would be associated with hydropower ($0.5 million). Minor negative impacts would be associated with non-agricultural and agricultural properties, while there would be no change in economic impacts for real estate or tourism/recreation compared to No Action. Annual average non- agricultural and agricultural property costs would approximate only an additional $41,400 compared to No Action. This loss is due to briefly longer periods of inundation on a relatively small amount of low lying lands in Arkansas and Oklahoma. xvi
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Table E-3. Summary of Incremental Net Benefits and Costs Flow Management Components – Reaches 1 through 6 Average Annual Equivalent Values (July 2004 $) 5.375% Discount Rate, 50-year Period of Analysis FM-175 FM-200 FM-OPS Period of Analysis (years) 50 50 50 Construction Period (years) 1 1 1 Interest Rate (percent) 5.375% 5.375% 5.375% Project First Costs 1, 2 12,105,000 16,094,000 0 Interest During Construction 295,400 392,700 0 Total Project Cost $12,400,400 $16,486,70 0 $0 Annual Costs: Interest 666,500 886,200 0 Amortization 52,500 69,000 0 Operations & Maintenance 0 0 0 Total Annual Costs $719,000 $955,900 $0 Annual Benefits 3 : Navigation benefits 9,220,700 9,176,100 8,372,100 Recreation -1,436,900 -790,200 0 Hydropower 1,340,000 1,056,000 466,000 Non-Ag. Property Damage
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