{[ promptMessage ]}

Bookmark it

{[ promptMessage ]}

NE102 Lecture Notes 3

How do they differ from aps subthreshold changes in

Info iconThis preview shows pages 23–26. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
How do they differ from APs? Subthreshold changes in Vm – current spreads passively, dissipating as it goes (unlike  APs, which are all-or-none and regenerate along membrane due to ion channels  opening.  Graded potentials spread passively (very fast) but do not regenerate like APs. They die out.  SUMMATION Summation  is the integration of the many incoming EPSPs and IPSPs by a  postsynaptic cell. REMINDER: APs are all-or-none. But neurons receive many synaptic inputs from other  neurons. What determines whether a neuron fires an AP or not? Whether the summed effect of all incoming EPSPs, minus the effect of all incoming  IPSPs at a given…. Spatial – A bunch of EPSPs coming in at the same time that cause the action potential  to fire.  Temporal summation – One of the pre-synaptic neurons is firing so fast that action  potential is fired. 
Background image of page 23

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Neuronal Biophysics III/Synaptic Plasticity 18:04 EPSPs and IPSPs sum (and can cancel each other out) NEUROTRANSMISSION Neurotransmission  is information transfer between neurons.  NE101 review: APs arriving at axon terminal trigger neurotransmission. Neurotransmission happens at points of close contact between two neurons –  synapses. Most neurotransmission occurs via the release of neurotransmitters from the  presynaptic cell, which diffuse across the synapse and bind to receptors on the  postsynaptic cell. Neurotransmission can result in EPSPs and IPSPs in the postsynaptic cell which affect  whether that cell will fire. New info: Calcium influx into the axon terminal in response to APs initiates neurotransmitter  release. Channels open when an AP arrives at terminal  Neurotransmitters are stored in vesicles in the axon terminal and arrive there by a  variety of mechanisms. NTs can get packaged into vesicles in the axon terminal in two ways: Enzymes that produce NTs localized to terminal, NTs synthesized locally and packaged  into vesicles. NTs synthesized in cell body (r on the way to terminal during localization), enter the  secretory pathway, and are shuttled to the terminal already in vesicles.  In either case, localization occurs via the same mechanisms we have already learned in  other contexts: Microtubules networks Microtubule-associated motor proteins The secretory pathway
Background image of page 24
Neuronal Biophysics III/Synaptic Plasticity 18:04 Process is just a specialized instance of the secretory pathway that we already know  (Clathrin, SNAREs, etc. all involved) Vesicle budding, as well as fusion and NT release, governed by the secretory pathway  proteins we learned earlier: Clathrin coats vesicles and promotes budding v-SNAREs and t-SNAREs interact, causing NT vesicles to dock closely with plasma  membrane to prepare for fusion. 
Background image of page 25

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Image of page 26
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

{[ snackBarMessage ]}