Article 4 preventing nurse burnout starts with

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Article 4:Preventing Nurse Burnout Starts With Understanding Causes(Quantative)Preventing Nurse Burnout Starts With Understanding Causes. (2017).Same-Day Surgery,41(10), 116–117. Retrieved from -com.lopes.idm.oclc.org/login.aspx?direct=true&db=ccm&AN=127714278&site=ehost-live&scope=siteAbstract:The article discusses how to prevent nurseburnoutand stress in ambulatory surgical centers (ASCs). The multiple factors that can contribute to such stress are explored including job frustration and overwork, poor work-life balance, and substance use issues. The significance of taking efforts to prevent nursing burnout starting with the hiring process is also tackled.Article 5::Predictors of burnout, work engagement and nurse reported job outcomesand qualityof care: a mixed method study. (Qualitative)Van Bogaert, P., Peremans, L., Van Heusden, D., Verspuy, M., Kureckova, V., Van de Cruys,Z., & Franck, E. (2017). Predictors of burnout, work engagement and nurse reported joboutcomes and quality of care: a mixed method study. BMC Nursing, 18, 1–14 .lopes.idm.oclc.org/10.1186/s12912-016-0200-4Abstract:High levels of work-related stress, burnout, job dissatisfaction, and poor health arecommon within the nursing profession. A comprehensive understanding of nurses' psychosocialwork environment is necessary to respond to complex patients' needs. The aims of this studywere threefold: (1) To retest and confirm two structural equation models exploring associationsbetween practice environment and work characteristics as predictors of burnout (model 1) andengagement (model 2) as well as nurse-reported job outcome and quality of care; (2) To studystaff nurses' and nurse managers' perceptions and experiences of staff nurses' workload; (3) Toexplain and interpret the two models by using the qualitative study findings. Method: This mixedmethod study is based on an explanatory sequential study design. We first performed a crosssectional survey design in two large acute care university hospitals. Secondly, we conductedindividual semi-structured interviews with staff nurses and nurse managers assigned to medicalor surgical units in one of the study hospitals. Study data was collected between September 2014and June 2015. Finally, qualitative study results assisted in explaining and interpreting thefindings of the two models. Results: The two models with burnout and engagement asmediating outcome variables fitted sufficiently to the data. Nurse-reported job outcomes andquality of care explained variances between 52 and 62%. Nurse management at the unit level andworkload had a direct impact on outcome variables with explained variances between 23 and36% and between 12 and 17%, respectively. Personal accomplishment and depersonalization hadan explained variance on job outcomes of 23% and vigor of 20%. Burnout and engagement had aless relevant direct impact on quality of care (=5%). The qualitative study revealed variousthemes such as organization of daily practice and work conditions; interdisciplinary

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