Its important to know this because when visual

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It's important to know this because when visual content is displayed on a device as a different aspect ratio one of two things has to happen. Either the image will be distorted to fill the screen or the image will be letterboxed which looks like this. Two black bars are used to fill in the unused space and to maintain the original aspect ratio. Now most display devices will allow you to choose between stretching or letterboxing the content and really in my opinion letterboxing is usually the better choice rather than skewing the aspect ratio of the content. Viewing Angle 4:55-5:37 Another specification used by display devices is the viewing angle, now the viewing angle defines the point at which the display image becomes unviewable. Either due to color distortion or to the image becoming too dark. Now the viewing angle's identified by a vertical and horizontal measure in degrees. For example, a standard viewing angle would be displayed as 170 degrees horizontal by a 160 degrees vertical. An easy way to think about the viewing angle is to compare it to a cone that extends from the display device. When you're looking at the screen from anywhere inside this cone the content on the display device can be easily seen, however looking at the screen from outside the cone results in extremely reduced image quality. Response Time 5:38-6:37 The next specification we need to talk about is response time. Now response time is the time measured in milliseconds that it takes for a single pixel to turn on and off. Now response times in older monitors used to be based on a black to black transition, however most modern response times specify a grey to grey transition instead. Now early flat panel monitors had a very slow response time, sometimes as slow as 20 milliseconds, which sounds pretty fast but it really wasn't. Now this was problematic because when pixels in a display can't change fast enough, fast moving content appears blurry. And sometimes you end up with a shadow or an image trail behind the object that's moving. This effect is known as motion blur,sometimes it's called ghosting. Now typically a response time of less than five milliseconds will reduce motion blur to an acceptable level, however faster response times might be required for some applications like say playing a computer game. Refresh Rate 6:38-7:56 Another specification that affects movement is the refresh rate, a displays refresh rate specifies the number of times the entire screen is redrawn every second. Refresh rates are measured in hertz and typical refresh rates range between 60 hertz and 144 hertz. Generally speaking, the faster the refresh rate the better the quality of the display and the higher quality when you're dealing with moving objects on the screen.
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