total fertility rate number of children a woman will have in her lifetime

Total fertility rate number of children a woman will

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total fertility rate: number of children a woman will have in her lifetime.
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Copyright © 2007 The Ontario Educational Communications Authority. All rights reserved. Canadian and World Issues CGW4U-A Lesson 2, page 3 World Population: The Numbers Within the next hour, there will be 8480 more people on this planet. That means an additional 67 840 people over an eight- hour shift of work or a good night’s sleep (see Figure 2.1). Time unit Births Deaths Natural increase Year 130 860 569 56 579 396 74 281 173 Month 10 905 047 4 714 950 6 190 098 Day 358 522 155 012 203 510 Hour 14 938 6 459 8 480 Minute 249 108 141 Second 4.1 1.8 2.4 Note : Figures may not add to totals due to rounding Figure 2.1. World vital events per time unit, 2006. Source : U.S. Census Bureau, International Data Base. Every second of 2006, there will be 4.1 births in the world. (Try saying ”four-point-one” every second for 10 seconds. Although you may stop counting, this growth never stops.) There are 1.8 deaths every second as well. So the population of the world is growing at the rate of 2.4 per second. This growth is known as natural increase. In 2006 alone, the population of almost two Canadas will be added to the world. Since the rate of natural increase itself increases as the total gets bigger, more and more people are added to the world every year, and available space and resources cannot accommodate this growth. The amount of water on this planet today is finite. If there are millions more thirsts to quench each year, there could be serious problems in the future. The capacity to grow more foods may increase through developments in agricultural science, but the additional food lands we need will not have the best soils, as these lands are already overused. Yet the people still come and the population still grows.
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Lesson 2, page 4 Canadian and World Issues CGW4U-A Copyright © 2007 The Ontario Educational Communications Authority. All rights reserved. The chart in Figure 2.2 shows the world’s total population for the thousand years from 1000 to 2000, and the chart in Figure 2.3 shows the UN prediction of world population figures for the years 2005 to 2050. Note that there are two different predictions on world population growth. The “High Growth” set of numbers assumes that high population growth will continue. The “Low Growth” set of numbers assumes lower growth as people throughout the world have smaller families and there are more diseases such as AIDS. Year Population (billions) Year Population (billions) 1000 0.30 1970 3.70 1250 0.31 1980 4.44 1500 0.50 1990 5.27 1750 0.79 2000 6.06 1800 0.98 1850 1.26 1900 1.65 1950 2.52 1960 3.02 Figure 2.2. World population increase between 1000−2000. Source : United Nations Population Division, Department of Economic & Social Affairs, “World Population to 2300,” Year High growth (in billions) Low growth (in billions) 2005 6.5 6.4 2010 7.0 6.7 2015 7.4 6.9 2020 7.9 7.2 2025 8.4 7.3 2030 8.8 7.5 2035 9.3 7.5 2040 9.7 7.5 2045 10.2 7.5 2050 10.6 7.4 Figure 2.3. United Nations high- and low-growth predictions.
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